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To Let The World In, Volume 1

Produced by Sanjay Tulsyan
A film on contemporary Indian art

Overview

Genre
Arts, Cultural History, and Politics
Synopsis

"To Let The World In, Volume 1" is a documentary on contemporary Indian art. It features conversations with ten of India's leading artists belonging to two generations, born in the 1930s, 40s and 50s. The first generation marked the return to narrative figuration in Indian art in the early 1980s, with the exhibition titled “Place for People”, which was held in Delhi and Mumbai. The following generation of artists became interlocutors for the earlier generation, while continuing their engagement with the narrative tradition.

The artists featured in the film are Arpita Singh, Gulammohammed Sheikh, Vivan Sundaram, Nilima Sheikh, Nalini Malani, Sudhir Patwardhan, Ranbir Kaleka, Pushpamala N., Anita Dube and Atul Dodiya, along with art critic and curator Geeta Kapur, who became an ideologue for this movement. The artists talk about the evolution of their practice, fondly invoking the memory of Bhupen Khakhar, a key artist of the group, who passed away in 2003.

Stage
finished
Running time
93 minutes

Credits

  • Avijit Mukul Kishore ... Cinematography and direction
  • Chaitanya Sambrani ... Curatorial concept and interviews
  • Suresh Rajamani ... Sound recording
  • Rikhav Desai ... Editing
  • Sagar Shiriskar ... Assistant director and cinematographer
  • Asheesh Pandya ... Additional sound
  • Gissy Michael ... Sound post-production
  • Sanjay Tulsyan ... Producer

Production Details

Prod. Co.
Art Chennai
Country
India
Years of Production
2012
Locations
Delhi, Mumbai, Baroda, Bangalore, Srinagar

Distribution Details

Release year
2012
Language
English, Hindi and Gujarati
Subtitles
English

Photos

To let the world in arpita singh_thumb
To let the world in nilima sheikh 2_thumb
To let the world in sudhir patwardhan 2_thumb
To let the world in vivan sundaram 2_thumb
To let the world in nalini malani_thumb
To let the world in gulammohammed sheikh_thumb

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