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Perry County

Where another state's toxic trash has become one man's treasure.

Overview

Genre
Environment, Minorities, Social Issues, Politics, and Public Affairs
Synopsis

PERRY COUNTY is a half-hour film documenting the controversial decision to dump millions of tons of coal ash waste from the 2008 Kingston, Tennessee spill at a landfill in this rural, predominately black community in central Alabama.

The short term benefits are clear: over $4 million dollars in dumping fees and 80 new temporary jobs in a region desperate for industry. But the long-term health and environmental risks, dismissed by local politicians, led by County Commissioner Albert Turner Jr., have raised a chorus of concern among local residents who question the true cost of this so-called progress.

Stage
finished
Running time
27 minutes

Credits

  • N'jeri Eaton ... Co-Director, Co-Producer, Co-Editor, Camera and Sound

Production Details

Country
United States
Years of Production
2009-2010
Locations
Perry County, Alabama and Atlanta, Georgia
Prod. Partners
Matt Durning, co-producer/director/camera/editor

Distribution Details

Release year
2010
Festivals
Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival, Peachtree International Film Festival, Red Rock Film Festival, Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival, Southern Appalachian Film Festival
Awards
North Gate Award for Best Documentary at UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, Best Public Health Film and Best Alabama Film at Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival
Language
English

Photos

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