the worldwide community of documentary professionals
You are not signed in.
Log in or Register

The Mentoring Room - Ask the Working Pros

This is a Public Topic geared towards first-time filmmakers. Professional members of The D-Word will come by and answer your questions about documentary filmmaking.

Resultset_first Resultset_previous 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 Resultset_next Resultset_last
Lorenzo Meccoli
Wed 11 Feb 2004Link
Thank you both!

Diane Bernard
Thu 4 Mar 2004Link
Hi to all:
It's been a while since I checked in here, glad to see engaging
questions since my last visit. Of course, my question is fairly
mundane in comparison.

I've shot a good amount of footage for my doc and am about to edit a
demo reel. I've installed Final Cut Pro 4 and am in the market for a
new external hard drive. Does anyone have any good recommendations? I
know it needs to be 7200 rpm but beyond that, I have no experience
with what would be good.

Any info is greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
Diane

Lorenzo Meccoli
Thu 4 Mar 2004Link
Dear Diane, I had a very good experience with the La Cie hard drives.
But you should not look at the new ones (Porsche design) which they
told me are not strong as the traditional ones. You can check on LaCie
website http://www.lacie.com/products/product.htm?id=10022 PS: they
are not paying me! Actually I paid them more then one time!!!

Diane Bernard
Fri 5 Mar 2004Link
Thanks a mil for the advice. I checked out the La Cie info and it
looks good and I also found a good price on one at a nearby Apple
Store. So I'm about to go out and get one.
Thanks!
Diane

Erica Ginsberg
Wed 17 Mar 2004Link
In answer to question posted here about music rights
{LINK NOT IMPORTED}

Even if you have a signed agreement with the cabaret performers for
rights to their rendition of the song, in most cases, you will also
have clear rights for the song itself (usually with the publisher).
You can check with ASCAP to see if the songs you want are created by
one of their members. It doesn't really matter if your project is
not-for-profit. If you are planning to screen your film in any kind
of public space (including the Internet), you will need rights.

Can't recall if you said you were based in NYC, but, if so, AIFV is
holding a session on production legal issues soon, so you might want
to attend to get more specific answers to your questions.
http://www.aivf.org/

Jan-Luc VanDamme
Wed 17 Mar 2004Link
*I am producing a documentary about a cabaret group in NYC. The main
feasibility questions that arise are about music use. Hopefully you can answer
these questions or can give insight as to who can help me with them.
*The project is not for profit. The songs used in the shows are popular ones,
but they are being played by a piano player with a singer. Must I secure rights
to use the music if it is being played by someone else in a stage show? What
other legalities must I look into to use it in a doc?
*Any information you can give would be greatly helpful and appreciated.

Thank You,

Erica Ginsberg
Thu 18 Mar 2004Link
see my answer in the post prior to your question (makes me feel like
i have psychic powers)

Doug Block
Thu 18 Mar 2004Link
Here's a very good article published in AIVF's magazine, The
Independent, about clearing music rights:

www.holytoledo.com/clear_music.htm

Maureen Futtner
Wed 24 Mar 2004Link
Hi filmmakers,

Just introduced myself & now I have QUESTIONS!

In the early stages of production of my first documentary on a
transgender pianist/singer who will be returning to her home country
(after having not been there for 25 years!) to perform in a series
of concerts. That's all I want to say about the project right now.
My question is regarding how much footage to shoot.
The return trip/concert is not for nearly another year and a half
yet, and I already have 16 hours of footage! Now, partially, I
realize my collaborator & I will have a ton of footage 'cause we're
novices, and need to work out a lot of kinks. But I'm also
concerned 'cause I keep wanting to shoot so much of her life. I do
plan to have the return trip be the final shoot, and we'll begin
post shortly after we get back. But, as I said, that trip is still
a year and a half away. Should I have a plan NOW for a maximum
amount of shooting to do? Any wisdom and advice would be greatly
appreciated!!
Maureen

Doug Block
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
Hard to answer that question, Maureen. It's largely going on
instinct. Wouldn't hurt to do a lot of interviews with your subject,
particularly when she's in the midst of doing something. Also seems
you have a possible built-in structure of beginning as she's taking
off for her trip, then continually flashing back as the concert tour
moves forward. Sort of like the past colliding with the present. In
the end, I recommend erring on the side of shooting, but also trying
not to overdo it. Tape is cheap but editors can be expensive.

Join this discussion now. You need to log in or register if you want to post.