the worldwide community of documentary professionals
You are not signed in.
Log in or Register

The Mentoring Room - Ask the Working Pros

This is a Public Topic geared towards first-time filmmakers. Professional members of The D-Word will come by and answer your questions about documentary filmmaking.

Resultset_first Resultset_previous 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Resultset_next Resultset_last
Lorenzo Meccoli
Wed 11 Feb 2004Link
Hello everybody, my name is Lorenzo Meccoli and I am a documentary
filmmaker and producer. I recently finished with Gabriele Zamparini a
long documentary, "XXI Century" (www.thecatsdream.com) which was
recently showed at IDFA and had a very good response from the public.
The question is: anybody knows were can I find prices of how much
buyers pay, on an average, for documentaries (small and big
broadcasters, DVDs and Tapes distributions, Theaters ecc.)? I know it
is a very general question but maybe, gaining some information here
and there I can try to have an idea. I read the whole forum "SELLING
IN THE INTERNATIONAL MARKETPLACE" but there were really not the
information I was looking for. Also: has anybody had experience in
selling in Italy to the printed media market? It is very common there
to buy film at the newsstand/bookstores where tapes and dvds are sold
with magazines, newspapers and books. Thank you for any help you can
give me.

Doug Block
Wed 11 Feb 2004Link
Lorenzo, please join The D-Word Community where the doc professionals
hang out. You're much more likely to get answers to these kinds of
questions there. Go to: www.d-word.com/community/join

As for what buyers pay, it varies, of course, and fluctuates all the
time. What ZDF/Arte paid me seven years ago for Home Page (90 minutes
in length, contractually) is almost irrelevant to what they'd pay now.
Also, you're talking about separate distributors for the various
ancillaries -- broadcast, theatrical, dvd/home video. Each with their
own price ranges.

Ben Kempas
Wed 11 Feb 2004Link
Doug, Lorenzo is already a member of the Community.

Lorenzo, you'll find a Marketing and Distribution topic in
{LINK NOT IMPORTED} ...

Doug Block
Wed 11 Feb 2004Link
Well, shut my mouth. A perfect illustration of how the community is
growing faster than my poor beleaguered mind can follow.

Lorenzo Meccoli
Wed 11 Feb 2004Link
Thank you both!

Diane Bernard
Thu 4 Mar 2004Link
Hi to all:
It's been a while since I checked in here, glad to see engaging
questions since my last visit. Of course, my question is fairly
mundane in comparison.

I've shot a good amount of footage for my doc and am about to edit a
demo reel. I've installed Final Cut Pro 4 and am in the market for a
new external hard drive. Does anyone have any good recommendations? I
know it needs to be 7200 rpm but beyond that, I have no experience
with what would be good.

Any info is greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
Diane

Lorenzo Meccoli
Thu 4 Mar 2004Link
Dear Diane, I had a very good experience with the La Cie hard drives.
But you should not look at the new ones (Porsche design) which they
told me are not strong as the traditional ones. You can check on LaCie
website http://www.lacie.com/products/product.htm?id=10022 PS: they
are not paying me! Actually I paid them more then one time!!!

Diane Bernard
Fri 5 Mar 2004Link
Thanks a mil for the advice. I checked out the La Cie info and it
looks good and I also found a good price on one at a nearby Apple
Store. So I'm about to go out and get one.
Thanks!
Diane

Erica Ginsberg
Wed 17 Mar 2004Link
In answer to question posted here about music rights
{LINK NOT IMPORTED}

Even if you have a signed agreement with the cabaret performers for
rights to their rendition of the song, in most cases, you will also
have clear rights for the song itself (usually with the publisher).
You can check with ASCAP to see if the songs you want are created by
one of their members. It doesn't really matter if your project is
not-for-profit. If you are planning to screen your film in any kind
of public space (including the Internet), you will need rights.

Can't recall if you said you were based in NYC, but, if so, AIFV is
holding a session on production legal issues soon, so you might want
to attend to get more specific answers to your questions.
http://www.aivf.org/

Jan-Luc VanDamme
Wed 17 Mar 2004Link
*I am producing a documentary about a cabaret group in NYC. The main
feasibility questions that arise are about music use. Hopefully you can answer
these questions or can give insight as to who can help me with them.
*The project is not for profit. The songs used in the shows are popular ones,
but they are being played by a piano player with a singer. Must I secure rights
to use the music if it is being played by someone else in a stage show? What
other legalities must I look into to use it in a doc?
*Any information you can give would be greatly helpful and appreciated.

Thank You,

Erica Ginsberg
Wed 17 Mar 2004Link
see my answer in the post prior to your question (makes me feel like
i have psychic powers)

Doug Block
Wed 17 Mar 2004Link
Here's a very good article published in AIVF's magazine, The
Independent, about clearing music rights:

www.holytoledo.com/clear_music.htm

Maureen Futtner
Wed 24 Mar 2004Link
Hi filmmakers,

Just introduced myself & now I have QUESTIONS!

In the early stages of production of my first documentary on a
transgender pianist/singer who will be returning to her home country
(after having not been there for 25 years!) to perform in a series
of concerts. That's all I want to say about the project right now.
My question is regarding how much footage to shoot.
The return trip/concert is not for nearly another year and a half
yet, and I already have 16 hours of footage! Now, partially, I
realize my collaborator & I will have a ton of footage 'cause we're
novices, and need to work out a lot of kinks. But I'm also
concerned 'cause I keep wanting to shoot so much of her life. I do
plan to have the return trip be the final shoot, and we'll begin
post shortly after we get back. But, as I said, that trip is still
a year and a half away. Should I have a plan NOW for a maximum
amount of shooting to do? Any wisdom and advice would be greatly
appreciated!!
Maureen

Doug Block
Wed 24 Mar 2004Link
Hard to answer that question, Maureen. It's largely going on
instinct. Wouldn't hurt to do a lot of interviews with your subject,
particularly when she's in the midst of doing something. Also seems
you have a possible built-in structure of beginning as she's taking
off for her trip, then continually flashing back as the concert tour
moves forward. Sort of like the past colliding with the present. In
the end, I recommend erring on the side of shooting, but also trying
not to overdo it. Tape is cheap but editors can be expensive.

Carolyn Projansky
Wed 24 Mar 2004Link
Greetings to all: I haven't been here in months, and never
really "got to know" the folks in D-Word, but I need some advice.
I've recently moved back to the US from South Africa and I'm
struggling to catch up with changes in the production world in the US
since 2000. I'm pricing a job now, trying to figure out what kind of
camera equipment to budget for. In SA everybody was using DVCam or
miniDV (PD150) for almost everything. Here that doesn't seem to be
the case. I'm trying to choose between shooting in BETACAM-SP or
DVCAM for a project in which the video segments will ultimately end
up on the web (for use in a web-based training program). The
surprising thing is that DVCAM seems to be more expensive than BETA
here. In South Africa it was the reverse. Anyone understand my
confusion and can help enlighten me? Thanks. Carolyn

Doug Block
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
That's a surprise to me, too, Carolyn. Can you give us some examples
of the pricing you've run across? Because a PD150 shoots dv-cam and
goes for, what, $3500? Where can you get a beta-sp camera for near
that price?

Carolyn Projansky
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
Doug: I think the price comparison was not for a PD150 versus BETACAM-
SP, but for a bigger DV-CAM camera, compared to a BETA-SP. I'll have
to get the specifics from my production manager. But do you, or does
someone else know whether it matters what I shoot with if it's going
to end up in a tiny box on the web? Will a better camera give a
crisper image so its better to spend the money? Or will it all end up
looking tiny and grainy so who cares?

Ben Kempas
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
A bigger camera is always nicer for its easy handling, decent
exposure, proper lens, less depth of field, and better reliability. As
long as your footage ends up on the net, the format really doesn't
matter. Could be a 300 or 500-series DVCAM, any Beta-SP, or anything
down to S-VHS. :-)

Carolyn Projansky
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
Thanks Ben. If anyone else out there has a opinion about format for
shooting direct-to-web I'd be interested.

Meanwhile, as long as I'm on the subject of cameras ... I have two
doccies I'm developing that raise camera questions, too. One is
definitely for int'l TV broadcast and I'm targeting the BBC
particularly. Is it best to shoot 16X9 these days and then compress,
or whatever you do for 4x3screenings? I'm still budgeting and so I
can select the shooting format as I choose. Although this one isn't
an "intimate" story, I generally prefer a smaller, more unobtrusive
camera for a documentary. Will all the broadcasters accept DVCAM
(the big kind) or is it better to go for HD nowadays? I'm not sure I
like the look of HD for a documentary. Are people having good
experiences with the "look" and "feel" of the format? What type of
film does it seem to work best for?

My other project is a very intimate doc which is destined either for
US tv or might be a feature doc for some cinema release. It depends
on how the characters work when we start shooting. We're going to do
a demo. But I don't want to shoot the demo material and then throw it
away. I'd like to start shooting with the format we're going to stay
with. What do you recommend? An intimate "family" story, needs to
be unobtrusive camera but great looking.

thanks very much! Carolyn

Erica Ginsberg
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
Hey Carolyn. Erica from WIFV here. Glad to hear you are back from
South Africa and welcome back to D-Word.

I'm surprised by the price differential too. Even if you are looking
at getting a crew with one of the higher end DVCAM cameras, it should
still be less expensive than Beta-SP. HD could be more expensive
though. How did you get your crew quotes? Did you try posting on
the WIFV listserv?

I'll let the cinematography experts answer your other questions, but
my understanding is that BBC absolutely requires 16X9.

Ben Kempas
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
What's wrong with the "look of HD for documentary"?

As a cinematographer, I've worked with HD - but not for "doccies".

Carolyn Projansky
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
I still don't have the specific price quotes but I spoke again to a
production manager who gets quotes all the time. She says that a
bunch of the major houses that rent camera equipment in the DC area
have all just recently upgraded to top DV Cam equipment and they're
now renting their "old" BETAs for less. Interesting. Plausible. I
haven't check the price quotes myself but this person is very
reputable. I'll check into it myself by the end of next week and
report back.

To Ben: I'm a complete novice with HD, but from what I've seen, it
has such sharp, detailed look that it is almost the antithesis of
film with its warm, soft, shadowy edges. It's hard to describe. I
think living in an HD world will take gradual adustment.

Carolyn Projansky
Thu 25 Mar 2004Link
Sorry, Erica, I forgot to say, "Hello" back to you. No, I didn't
post this on the listserve, but I've been working with a production
manager we had recommended by the listserve. Thanks for your
comments. Carolyn

Erica Ginsberg
Fri 26 Mar 2004Link
Carolyn, you would probably get better quotes if your production
manager went to individual cameramen or a boutique house rather than
a major house (or, if you already have a cinematographer sans the
right camera, it may be cheaper to buy him the camera as part of his
payment than to rent one for him). If the major houses think they
can charge top dollar for the same camera quality as a cameraman with
his own equipment, they will likely go the way of top post production
houses which can no longer compete for the offline market while
everyone has Avids and FCP in their home offices. While you were
gone, Henninger went bankrupt and then had to retool their operation
and, as you know, Roland House recently went out of business
altogether.

Robert Goodman
Fri 26 Mar 2004Link
there is no single flavor of HD nor an agreed upon
definition of what is or isn't considered HD.

Blanket statements about what something looks like
is like suggesting that 35mm has a single look.
To dissuade yourself about that - rent Northfork,
Malcom X, and Schindler's List.

Join this discussion now. You need to log in or register if you want to post.