the worldwide community of documentary professionals
You are not signed in.
Log in or Register

The Mentoring Room - Ask the Working Pros

This is a Public Topic geared towards first-time filmmakers. Professional members of The D-Word will come by and answer your questions about documentary filmmaking.

Resultset_first Resultset_previous 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Resultset_next Resultset_last
Dustan Lewis McBain
Mon 11 May 2009Link

Hey Sahand,

you right, however choosing music has been one of the hardest things for me. Its hard to choose something that fits perfectly? not too cheesy but not to controlling over the video. Ill fix it up and bring it back up to this site, cheers,


Diane Johnson
Wed 13 May 2009Link

Can someone explain what the Fernanda Rossi – aka The Documentary Doctor ad on d-word is all about? and is it free?


Doug Block
Thu 14 May 2009Link

It's an announcement not an ad, Diane. Fernanda is our guest expert for a special 5-Day topic on the subject of story structure for documentaries. It will start on Monday and be open to the general public (aka Enthusiasts), as well as to all D-Word members, and will be archived after the week is over. And, yes, it's free.

Edited Thu 14 May 2009 by Doug Block

Diane Johnson
Thu 14 May 2009Link

that sounds fantastic


Yixi Villar
Thu 21 May 2009Link

Hi hi hi.. i was wondering if anyone has any feedback on FRACTURED ATLAS fiscal sponsorship program?


Jennifer MacDonald
Thu 21 May 2009Link

Hi! I'm trying to break into the business working on documentary films. I currently work as a TV reporter so I have background in shooting, writing, interviewing , editing, ect but want to change career paths. How do I get a paid position working on films? I've gone through craigslist but haven't had much luck. Any tips?

Edited Thu 21 May 2009 by Jennifer MacDonald

Doug Block
Fri 22 May 2009Link

What is it you want to do in documentaries, Jennifer? Produce? Direct? Most folks just start out by making a film themselves. Another option is to try and find Associate Producing or editing gigs. It's actually pretty hard to answer that question.


Kaoru Wang
Fri 22 May 2009Link

I'm having issues putting together a budget. I'm shooting with miniDV and editing with FCP and all the sample budgets I found have have a lot of things on the budget pertaining to film and renting avid equipment and such. Plus I don't understand some of the categories such as beta tapes, video 1' stock, video dubs ect...Help!


Jennifer MacDonald
Fri 22 May 2009Link

Yeah.. I was thinking about making one while keeping my day job. I would want to do the writting, researching and setting up interviews and shots. I think that would be more the producer side? I think I understand that there isn't just a company that churns out films.. it's more a labor of love with money making jobs on the side?


Georgi James
Mon 25 May 2009Link

I've enjoyed this week so much. Thanks.

I would like to use a 70s theme song for my film. Do you know how I go about getting permission to use the song.

G.


David Mcilvride
Mon 25 May 2009Link

There's quite a few companies (and freelance individuals) who specifically work on music clearances .. they're the best resource for clearing music.


Andy Schocken
Mon 25 May 2009Link

In reply to Jennifer MacDonald's post on Thu 21 May 2009 :

I think the best way to go about making a living with documentaries is to target one specific role, and hone your craft. You'll rarely make much money directing or producing docs, but you can do fine earning a day-rate as an editor/sound recordist/cinematographer... So I would focus on that, and make your own films on the side. Eventually, that part of your work will start taking precedence.


John Burgan
Mon 25 May 2009Link Tag

In reply to Georgi James's post on Sun 24 May 2009 :

Be prepared how expensive this can be, especially for well-known hits. Check out this BBC guide to clearing music rights


Steven Dhoedt
Tue 26 May 2009Link

I would like to know a bit more about release forms for documentaries, for locations and for people.

To what extend are they really necessary?
I have tons of interviews with people who all agreed in advance (generally by email or over the phone) to participate in my film. They have a clear understanding of what the film is about. The fact that they do a one hour interview with me already proves that they are willing to participate, right? Some of them have signed release forms, other ones haven't (yet), simply because we didnt have any at hand at the time. should i contact all these people again and get them sign this paper?

Also, what about people who are in the shot (e.g. street shots, shots on conferences...you know, b-roll footage that establishes a location etc. surely it would be impossible to go up to every single one of them in the shot and get them sign a paper?

For you documentary makers out there, what's your views on release forms? I often find it rather threatening to the subject I am interviewing, to do an interview and then shove a paper under their nose with lots of legal terms. I think it can frighten a lot of people, even if you tell them it's just a pro forma document.

And what about logo's and advertisements that are in the frame, even in the background? does all these have to be cleared as well? Is this only needed for the US, or do European and Asian distributors and broadcasters also demand this?

looking forward to hear your views on this


Tom Dziedzic
Tue 26 May 2009Link

Stephan, I try to get written releases from everyone I interview and who may be in the film. Or if it's a quick spontaneous interview or scene, I get a verbal agreement while the camera is rolling before or after the interview.

I can't recommend this book enough, it has helped me tremendously: Clearance & Copyright: Everything You Need to Know for Film and Television by Michael C. Donaldson. It's an essential reference book to have around.


Peter Brauer
Wed 27 May 2009Link

If you want your movie to end up on television or in theaters, you generally need to have a release from basically everyone in the film. You can use a very simply worded release that people will understand. So yes, I think you should get releases from everyone in the film. That is unless you don't intend on buying E and O insurance to show it publicly.

As for the b-roll question, you don't need releases for crowd shots. However if one person is singled out on screen for any significant amount of time you need a release.

As for logo's in the background of the frame, so long as you didn't put them there, you are good. Incidentally shot logos are generally covered by fair use, which means you don't need clearance. However if you intentionally put a logo in frame, that is another story.


Tsvetina Kamenova
Fri 29 May 2009Link

FUNDING APPLICATIONS QUESTION

Hello all,

I am in the process of drafting various funding applications for a feature-length documentary currently in production and firstly I want to thank you for the amazing wealth of information you have all helped to create on the d-word. I have a few questions, however, that I have not been able to answer by looking at past posts.

1. Is it a good idea to reference other films in the proposal as a way to describe intended style, structure etc?

2. I know that some funders say they like pictures in the proposal, but is it ever not a good idea to put pictures? If you do have pictures, how do you usually use them?

3. Does anyone have experience with the Sundance Documentary Fund application? I am looking through their guidelines and they specify that they want a summary and then a synopsis. Do you know if by synopsis they are really looking for a treatment? (Is it ok to contact them and ask?)

I would really appreciate any input you might have.

Thanks a lot.


Doug Block
Sat 30 May 2009Link

Hi, Tsvetina.

1. Yes

2. Use photos if they're very strong and support and enhance what you're saying in the text. I'd wrap the text around them, but you can also put it at the top of your synopsis or treatment.

3. By all means you should call them. They're very nice and helpful and speaking to them will give you an opportunity to get your film on their radar (especially if you've found a good way to describe it in a sentence or two). Wait until you have a couple of questions, though.


Christopher Wong
Sat 30 May 2009Link

call Kristin Feeley or Win-Sie Tow. both of them (women) are extremely nice, and will answer any question you have about the application.

i was lucky enough to get a grant from them back in 2007, but when i applied, there was only a request for a "Statement of Objective" and a "Narrative Summary". there was no mention of a synopsis, which i basically folded into the Narrative Summary.


Tsvetina Kamenova
Sat 30 May 2009Link

Hi Doug and Christopher,

Thanks a lot for your responses. It helps to know that I am on the right track generally with the film references and the pictures. I was a bit confused before since, although in interviews representatives of the funds would say they like pictures for example, I never saw any in the "Example" proposals on the websites nor do any of them reference other films.

And Chris, thanks for letting me know who to speak to.

Good luck to both of you with your projects and I hope I can be helpful in return in the future.

Many greetings from Beijing,

Tsvetina


Doug Block
Sat 30 May 2009Link

From Beijing, huh? Well, maybe you can become Skype buddies with the Sundance folks ;-)


Nicole Bracy
Sat 6 Jun 2009Link

Next week, I will be in Washington, D.C. at a national conference where we have the exclusive rights to videotape the entire conference. Big names will be presenting, Ted Kennedy will be accepting a Legacy Award. In addition to taping the conference, we are hoping to get exclusive interviews. The problem is we're working with a broad release. We were informed by our lawyer that the language was so broad that no one of that stature would sign the release. Could you point me in the right direction as far as language used in such a release?


Gregory Rossi
Tue 9 Jun 2009Link

I'm moving onto a new phase for CONNECT USA, my Connect Four doc. I'll be interviewing media analysts, think tankers, talking heads and news types to discuss/investigate the notion of the USA being a nation politically divided. I can find contact information for many people but some celebrities are more elusive like Janeane Garofalo. Are there any suggestions for getting a hold of someone like her?

we live in the same neighborhood but I just can't roam these streets forever...


Andrew David Watson
Thu 11 Jun 2009Link

Tsvetina do you live in Beijing? I may end up in Beijing the first week of September and may have some questions.


Marshall Burgtorf
Fri 12 Jun 2009Link

I've got a copyright question. I've found a a couple videos on youtube that I am wanting to use in my project on violence in youth sports. One of the videos was posted on a California newspaper youtube page. I contacted them to get permission to use it. Unfortunately they no longer know who the original owner of the video is. It is a video of parents going crazy at a football game.

The other videos are of the same subject matter but went viral years ago and it seems impossible to track down the original owner of the content.

I've read through The Code for Best Practices in Fair Use and it would appear that I can use it. I want to make sure everything we do is legal and I also want to give credit where credit is due.

Any ideas from the most knowledgeable keepers of all things documentary?


Jill Kelly
Fri 12 Jun 2009Link

hello, i have a question about which way to direct my focus within my indie film making career.This would all be under the assumption that the films are of good quality,well shot,directed and edited.

what would be the pro's and cons of two directions?
one being funding the doc's ourselves completely, then once completed pitching them to television broadcasters.
Two being to search for funding,and/or produce in cooperation with a broadcaster.
I have the general ability to go either way, neither is really very easy alas my inquiry, Thanks


Marshall Burgtorf
Sun 14 Jun 2009Link

In reply to Marshall Burrgtorf's post on Thu 11 Jun 2009 :

I guess I should posted this in the archives topic. Sorry gang, I haven't been around for awhile. I got it straightened out though.


Doug Block
Sun 14 Jun 2009Link

No worries, Marshall, you'll get the hang of it. The important thing is you're posting again.


Monica Williams
Mon 15 Jun 2009Link

I have a question about independent educational distribution. I have a copies ready to go of a 1 &1/2 hour film of an interview I did with Susan Neiman on her book Evil in Modern Thought. I'm very happy with it and it is in demand with a certain group of professors and philosophy students.

I'm building a website for it, but I'm clueless about the appropriate & practical steps to independently distribute something like this to universities and conferences. I have an endorsement from a professor who used the film at Loyola and I have been receiving requests for the film. I don't see the need to look for a distributor, but I may be wrong.

I have an idea about a price structure. For educational purposes, $1000 and individual copies at $30. Are there legal papers that someone paying the higher price to show in front of an audience will have to sign? Should I sell the personal copies for the much lower price, through my website? Does this lower my chances of receiving the proper payment from professors looking to use my film?

Any advice is so appreciated – Thanks


Elan Frank
Tue 16 Jun 2009Link

Hi,
My name is Elan Frank; I am a documentary film maker residing in LA.
I am now in the process of developing a documentary film on the co-existence between Jews and Muslims in Morocco and got to the sage of presenting investors with a business plan and production package, including a proposed budget.
I was wondering if anyone could refer me to samples of such packages/forms, what is essential to have in them, and a one-page budget sample form that is satisfactory to investors (I have my budget format, but it is in excel and very details, not something you provide investors. I am looking for a designed one page with the essentials.
Thanks you. I am glad to be part of this documentary family here in D-word!
Elan


Monica Williams
Wed 17 Jun 2009Link

In reply to Monica Williams's post on Sun 14 Jun 2009 :

I just needed to do more homework – never mind my question – I realize there are no clear answers though I wish there were.


Robert Shore
Thu 18 Jun 2009Link

Hi all- I haven't posted in a while. I've got a new series that I am writing up for the August deadline for the National Endowment for the humanities. Does anyone have any advice, specific or general, about NEH-specific grant-writing? Thanks, Rob.


Dustan Lewis McBain
Fri 19 Jun 2009Link

Hey guys, quick questions, im shooting a high school reunion with 300 people, and im using a panasonic dvx 100b. Firstly, what mic should i use? and secondly, what preferences should i shoot under? Maybe i could shoot with a slow shutter speed? idn any ideas?


Sudeshna Chowdhury
Sat 27 Jun 2009Link

Hi this is Sudeshna here. I want to be a filmmaker and really keen on making documentaries. RIght now am working for a news channel. could you plaese tell me how do I start. Yes, I was told that I should start making videos and post it on websites. Could you please let me know how do i begin and which are the potential websites i should send my work to?


John Burgan
Sat 27 Jun 2009Link

It depends very much on you, Sudeshna: what interests you? What's going on in your area? What stories do you want to tell? The website part is easy (you can use Youtube or Vimeo), but it's the work that counts. Are there any films which have inspired you?

Edited Sat 27 Jun 2009 by John Burgan

Sudeshna Chowdhury
Mon 29 Jun 2009Link

Hello John
Yes films that mostly deal with social and religious issues interest me. I have watched a couple of documentaries by Satyajit Ray whicb have insppired me a lot. Also this film called La Americana have motivated me to further explore subjects. I have also watched a copule of documentaries on Maoists in India. Well these are teh kind of stories that I intend to tell. Am making short videos( which i shoot with my handy cam and right now cany afford one due to financial constraints)but what i am looking at is to become part of an organisation that will give me good exposure. These of course are my views but i don't know how it actually works. Your seggestions please??


David W Grant
Tue 30 Jun 2009Link

ABOUT VIDEO ESSAYS that use docu-drama – Where do 'documentaries of the future' exist? A film that posits a possible future? Such a film obviously could be declared 'fiction'. Is there a genre of this type?
Thanks.


Craig Schneider
Thu 2 Jul 2009Link

Hi all,
Does anyone have any advice/experience shooting Sweet 16 videos? I'm shooting one this Friday documentary style, so i won't be directing so much as just capturing the moments (and there's plenty of dance numbers and such to capture), but it's my first paid job as a documentary videographer and my first Sweet 16, and I know the family, so I want to do this right. I have experience shooting formal events with my cousin's wedding and a friend's wedding. However, I'm shooting this on my own, with a Panasonic DVX100a, and my journalistic instincts. Would you recommend a lav mic on the birthday girl if she would have it? I wasn't going to bother just to simplify. If i do direct at all, is there anything fun you'd recommend shooting with her and her "court" or her court alone? I can let the photographer take the lead on this stuff of course during the photo shoot, but I think it may also be good to have her close friends and family say/do something. Would you recommend I use a separate mic during the party for that? I have a RES50B. This is really a big deal for her and her family, and they trust me to do an amazing job. I know what they have planned for the day and night, and i plan to capture some behind the scenes, getting ready moments, and the excitement and fun. I also posted in the legal section to ask about a contract template just to protect myself (I've only done pro bono before). Other than charge my batteries and get close with the camera and shotgun mic, work my angles, am I forgetting anything? I also do mostly handheld so i'm thinking that a monopod vs. a tripod would be better. Lastly, if anyone can recommend a place in NYC to pick up a spare and relatively inexpensive DVX100a battery, let me know. It's going to be a long day.
Thanks.


Doug Block
Thu 2 Jul 2009Link

Craig, as someone who's shot well over a hundred weddings, I say don't fret too much. Unless you're a hopeless incompetent (which you're not), they're gonna love what you shoot, I guarantee it. Normal people aren't used to seeing themselves captured verite-style and it's always a hoot for them.

Technically speaking, I'd simply use a good directional mic on the camera (like a Sennheiser 416), get in fairly close as much as you can, and definitely shoot handheld. Screw the tripod. And I'd set up as little as possible, just be a total fly on the wall. But that's me.

Have fun and lotsa luck.


Craig Schneider
Thu 2 Jul 2009Link

A few other related questions to my previous Sweet 16 post that i forgot to ask: I normally shoot my documentary footage in 24P on the DVX100a in squeeze mode. Do you see any issues with using that format for the Sweet 16 video? Do videographers at the formal events normally just wear a black button down shirt and slacks? When i was i shot weddings, i was actually in the wedding party so i wore a suit. And I am renting one of those light panels for the top of my camera for low light situations, but i haven't tested one out. Advice? Thanks again.


Craig Schneider
Thu 2 Jul 2009Link

Thanks, Doug. I was hoping you would post. Now I'll stop my fretting. Thanks for the sage advice.


Craig Schneider
Fri 3 Jul 2009Link

Doug, I didn't get very far in "legal" on my contract template request. Can I ask how you handle getting stuff in writing? All I have now is a verbal agreement on the price. I feel like it would be good business practice to protect myself, on this job or when i don't know the family. Have a great July 4th weekend.


Doug Block
Fri 3 Jul 2009Link

Craig, just emailed you my standard, one-page wedding agreement. Hope it helps. BTW, the Mentoring Room is for Enthusiasts, not Members, so keep stuff like this in the Legal topic in the future.

Edited Fri 3 Jul 2009 by Doug Block

Brian Boyko
Tue 14 Jul 2009Link

Short question with a complicated answer: Have any of you guys ever filmed in Cuba? I figure before I start doing research about how to get permission to go to Cuba as a journalist from the State Dept., I could ask here, and see if anyone's got any experience with it.


John Burgan
Tue 14 Jul 2009Link

As you're already a Member, Brian, you can pose this question in the Production Topic. There are several colleagues who I'm sure will be able to ask your question.


Mark Barroso
Tue 14 Jul 2009Link

In reply to Brian Boyko's post on Tue 14 Jul 2009 :

Brian: you can email me off list and I'll give you my phone number, but the short answer is unless you have a letter from an accredited news organization that's recognized by the State Dept., you will not qualify for a journalist exemption to the travel ban.

Assuming you do not have relatives there, that leaves you the option of going illegally, or under the license of a humanitarian group. I can advise you on that, too. Depending on what you want to do, you will also have to fly under the radar of the Cuban govt.


Brian Boyko
Tue 14 Jul 2009Link

In reply to Mark Barroso's post on Tue 14 Jul 2009 :

We considered that possibility, but isn't there an application process for freelance journalists?

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1097.html
"Free-Lance Journalism – Persons with a suitable record of publication who are traveling to Cuba to do research for a free-lance article. Licenses authorizing transactions for multiple trips over an extended period of time are available for applicants demonstrating a significant record of free-lance journalism."

If we can't get special permission, we're considering contacting BBC, Reuters, AFP, EFE, CNN, etc., to see if they could use some stringers in Cuba, work under their aegis, and film the doc in-between assignments.

I'll e-mail you off-list, Mark.


Brian Boyko
Wed 15 Jul 2009Link

In reply to John Burgan's post on Tue 14 Jul 2009 :

Cool – I didn't notice I was promoted in my absence!


Brian Boyko
Sun 19 Jul 2009Link

Just a quick update: We had our meeting this afternoon with everyone on board. The producers didn't consider all the problems that we might have, and when I spelled them out, they realized that there was no way that they could pull off the movie with a reasonable chance of success at this time.

However, we quickly moved onto our secondary project, which will likely be an examination of Tango in Argentina.


Mark Barroso
Tue 21 Jul 2009Link

I would love to meet the performers who pass the examination. Take me with you.


George Bahash
Wed 22 Jul 2009Link

I am wondering about the best way to approach people or organizations I want to interview. what are the pros and cons of showing unannounced versus trying to get an appointment. my questions are not intended to be confrontational. thanks.


Mark Barroso
Sun 26 Jul 2009Link

Unannounced is synonymous with ambush interviews. News people do this when they intentionally want to make people look bad. Making appointments is considered civilized and professional.


J. Christian Jensen
Wed 29 Jul 2009Link

COMPARABLE FILMS DATA

Hey folks, I'm a young producer in the development stage of a documentary and I'm trying to get some data on comparable films for budget projection (DVD sales, Rentals, Negative Costs, P&A Costs, Domestic and Foreign TV, etc.) Are there any places that have this kind of information at a reasonable price? Anywhere that specializes in the more obscure documentary titles?


James Longley
Wed 29 Jul 2009Link

You're asking about a wide range of data that is unlikely to be covered by a single source.
On the one hand you have production and post production costs, on the other you have projected revenue streams. Very different stuff.
About costs of filmmaking – these are roughly quantifiable. About revenues – these are much harder to know and depend very much on your film and all sorts of variables in the way it's made and released that you can't easily predict.
Suffice it to say that if you structure the project around the distinct possibility that your film will never be profitable, you are unlikely to be disappointed.


J. Christian Jensen
Wed 29 Jul 2009Link

Thanks James,

Ha ha, yeah we're well prepared for that un-profitability possibility, but the donors/investors would like to at least see what's been achieved with other similar films.

Obviously there's BoxOfficeMojo for theatrical grosses. I know that Baseline Research (http://www.blssresearch.com/) sells other data:

- $20 a title (negative costs, P&A, rentals, & video units and gross)
- $50 a title (for expanded domestic and foreign TV)
- $70 for ROI reports

They have a pretty sparse selection of documentaries though. I just wondered if some company specialized in this kind of data for documentaries or smaller indie pics, but I guess not.

Fortunately, my particular film has some elements of marketability as well as some social objectives that might make it more interesting to donors interested in mideast peace and not in profit.

On that note, have any of you social issues filmmakers heard of L3C legal status?


Laura Moire Paglin
Wed 29 Jul 2009Link

Unless you're proposing a reality TV like scenario (eg Supersize Me), I don't suggest going the investor route. You'll have to pay an attorney just to draw up the LLC and PPM – unless you already have an investor ready to throw in $100,000. Even if your film has some marketable elements, that by no means, indicates that it will be commercially profitable.


Doug Block
Wed 29 Jul 2009Link

In reply to J. Christian Jensen's post on Tue 28 Jul 2009 :

Once again, please don't double post, as you asked this in the Legal topic, so any additional answers should go there. Not to mention, this is a topic for Enthusiasts, not Members.


J. Christian Jensen
Wed 29 Jul 2009Link

Sorry Doug,

I'm still getting used to the lay of the land here. :|


J. Christian Jensen
Wed 5 Aug 2009Link

POST GRADUATE DOCUMENTARY DEGREE

What are the best MFA programs specializing in documentary film out there (both in and out of the U.S.)?

I'm considering applying to some MFA programs specializing in documentary film either this fall or next fall. I have a pretty good academic record, strong writing abilities and a respectable resumé of non-fiction film experience.

I'm very serious about increasing my diversity as a documentary filmmaker but most of the programs that I have heard about structure their curriculum around narrative/fiction films.

Any suggestions on schools I should look into?


Michael Wolcott
Wed 5 Aug 2009Link

In reply to J. Christian Jensen's post on Tue 4 Aug 2009 :

I did a Master's (not MFA) in Australia and had a great experience and hopefully came back a much better filmmaker, my problems were I came back to the US with no contacts and no real idea of how to get funding in the US. Still though, my degree is what landed me my current job.


J. Christian Jensen
Wed 5 Aug 2009Link

In reply to Michael Wolcott's post on Tue 4 Aug 2009 :

Thanks Michael,

What school did you attend? In my particular case, I'm not pursuing the degree necessarily to try and land a job. I already have several options for jobs but I want to attend a school that has the alumni network and the curriculum that is on the cutting edge of what's happening in the documentary world.

I'm particularly interested in building strong networks with filmmakers who are really pushing the limits of the genre. I would also like to give myself the option to teach on a University level at some point later in the future, which requires at least a Masters.


Michael Wolcott
Wed 5 Aug 2009Link

I went to the University of Technology, Sydney. I had a lot of great teachers who were a part of the '70s/'80s Australian film & documentary movement, like Tom Zubrycki & Jeni Thornley (who just released a really interesting looking film Island Home Country). The film dept. is small though so you probably wouldn't get the kind of network that you'd be looking for there.

One of the reasons I went on for a Masters was also for the ability to teach in the future, without an MFA though I think my options are somewhat limited. Until of course my first blockbuster documentary is released.


J. Christian Jensen
Wed 5 Aug 2009Link

Yeah, I'm working on my first blockbuster documentary right now too. ;)


John Burgan
Thu 6 Aug 2009Link

In reply to J. Christian Jensen's post on Tue 4 Aug 2009 :

Check out this list of courses


Yocheved Sidof
Thu 13 Aug 2009Link

Hello fellow filmmakers

Wanted to get some advice here. At a tough spot with my film. Its a character/story driven doc that also has elements of issue- themed doc as well...

Protagnist on quest to find love- adheres to strict Jewish law forbidding touch between opposite genders. Can she find love without touch?

Have tons of compelling footage, lots of opposition from her family, keepng law gets harder as their relationship progressess. They end up getting maried without touching eachother once.

Cut into the story, we also want to tackle the broader isse- what is the law? benefits? why is its observance 'dying out' within observant Jewish circles? is it healthy? what is the best way to learn about sex? How do other cultures view premarital sex? sex ed system, etc..

Question:
Weve spent the past 1.5 yr capturing, cutting scenes, interviews some experts, interviewing other young people about sex, etc. Also tried to edit whole cut of hjust protaganist story without tackoling issue at all... Now we feel stuck. Should we back-track and write a script? Should we figure out the 'issue' stuff and shoot it? Should we hire an outside prof editor at tis point? A doc doctor? Should we be looking for other stories to intertwine with this one?

Need some advice here!

Thanks in advance!!


Marj Safinia
Thu 13 Aug 2009Link

Yocheved, since you already asked this question on the member side, and have already started getting answers there, you should pursue this discussion in the other topic. No double-posting on D-Word. Most people read everything.


Yocheved Sidof
Thu 13 Aug 2009Link

Sorry :( Learning the rules here... ;)


Marj Safinia
Thu 13 Aug 2009Link

no worries :)


Sharon Hewitt
Mon 17 Aug 2009Link

Hello, I just joined, so please let me know if my post does not adhere to the rules of the community. I'm producing my first documentary and plan to shoot in HD and would like to meet broadcast standards. I'm considering purchasing Panasonic's new AG-HMC-40 (H.264 MPEG-4 using 3-1/4.1" CMOS image sensors). Can anyone tell how to be sure the camera I'm considering meets broadcast standards?


Chris Clauson
Mon 17 Aug 2009Link

Sharon,
I just joined too and am planning my first doc with a similar camera. I am not sure what broadcast standards will really be as the web blends with TV in the near future. The camera I plan to get is the Panasonic hdc-tm300, which is a stripped-down version of the one you want. It has very similar specs, though. I am interested to hear about your doc and how you plan to gather the material.


Sharon Hewitt
Mon 17 Aug 2009Link

Chris,
Thanks for the info. I wasn't aware of the camera you mentioned, but I checked it out and it is very similar to the one I'm considering. I plan to cover my topic by recording my subjects in their natural settings as well as through interviews. As of now, there are approximately 25 specific days over a 9 month span that I'd like to cover. I have some flexibility on the number of days I can devote, but not much. If needed, I'll trim some of these days to add other material as it develops. Tell me a little about your doc.


Chris Clauson
Tue 18 Aug 2009Link

Sharon,
I'm just trying to figure out how to do a character-driven doc on a local woman who is on a personal mission to save unwanted pets. I hope to do it in episodes for a start-up web/cable TV station. Then,who knows, maybe there will be enough good stuff for a real doc. As I mentioned before, I plan to shoot most of it on the TM-300, which is really small and lightweight. The interviews can be shot on my JVC hd200. When I picture this story, it vaguely looks like Jon and Kate Plus Eight...that kind of reality. When the episodes run in this two county area, I hope it builds awareness of the plight of the animals and that people will donate and/or adopt. The documentary will have a bigger focus on an over-arching topic when I can get enough material. I am the shooter for this and my husband is the editor. He uses FCP. What is your doc about in general?


jane taylor
Thu 20 Aug 2009Link

Hello D-word

I'm Jane Taylor and currently studying an MA at the University of Salford, Manchester, UK in Television Documentary Production.

I am at the stage now where I am conquering my dissertation. I got extremely inspired by the Documentary Campus event at the Manchester Town hall – Leaner Meaner and Keener, and have based my dissertation on the effect the internet has on documentary.

I would really appreciate some opinions, experiences and professional advice on this subject. How the internet plays a part in documentary distribution in a good way and bad way? advantages and disadvantages? What's the future? How it has helped you business or film? Everything and anything would be highly appreciated.

Many Thanks,


Doug Block
Fri 21 Aug 2009Link

Jane, the short answer is that the internet has been a great boon for marketing and promoting your docs, and hasn't nearly reached its promise as a serious distribution platform, especially for long-form docs. Whether it ever will is the (multi) million dollar question.


Jaty MacMillan
Fri 21 Aug 2009Link

Hello All,
I've just joined and was wondering if there were any posts about copyright violation on torrents sites. They're offering my film on free downloads and i need to find out how to have it removed


Susheel Kurien
Fri 21 Aug 2009Link

Hi all
I am shooting a film that has extensive performance of jazz standards. The musicians have given us releases for their peformance but I need to understand a) how to get performance rights from the publisher b)what these rights would cost.. I am trying to budget this and appreciate any help ..FYI examples: Green Dolphin St, Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White, At Last, Moanin' etc

thanks


Mark Barroso
Sat 22 Aug 2009Link

In reply to Jaty MacMillan's post on Fri 21 Aug 2009 :

I can't help you, but I'm curious how you found out. I'd like to check for my own work.


stephen watson
Thu 27 Aug 2009Link

In reply to Doug Block's post on Sat 12 Mar 2005 :

Hi Doug
I have a similar question and the weblink for that article is no longer available. Do you have any other suggestions on obtaining synch licenses?


stephen watson
Thu 27 Aug 2009Link

In reply to Kyoko Yokoma's post on Fri 11 Mar 2005 :
Hi
What was the outcome relating to the licenses for the songs u needed?


Doug Block
Thu 27 Aug 2009Link

Stephen, I'd simply do a Google search: "sync licenses for film". I'm sure it'll turn up something useful.


alix de roten
Tue 1 Sep 2009Link

PAl/NTSC in HD?

Hello everybody! I'm new there but it seems this is the place to ask a technical question.
I'm going to shoot in Latin America for a documentary that will be edited here in Spain. I will do it with a Panasonic HD, AG-HVX200, so recording on P2 card. As it is the first time I shoot in HD, I don't know if we still have the PAL/NTSC problem.
I have a good oportunity to rent the Panasonic in Latin america, but I need to know for sure that it will be no problem.

Someone can help me about this?

thank you a lot


Robert Goodman
Wed 2 Sep 2009Link

Countries that are on the PAL standard for SD have HD cameras that record at 25 and 50 frames per second. Panasonic cameras from NTSC countries (US/Japan)record at 24 and 30 frames per second. Editing is not a problem though best not to mix 24 fps and 25 fps material unless you really have to.


alix de roten
Wed 2 Sep 2009Link

Thank you Robert. I understand from you answer that, when you record in HD on P2, the only difference bw PAL and NTSC is about frames por second.
So I have another question, as it is the first time I will be editing in Final Cut (changing from AVID), does Final Cut allow you to import material recorded at 30 fps, and change it into 25 fps?
And another question (sorry but nobody is able to tell me that in Barcelona). The P2 card for the camera are the same for PAL / NTSC cameras? (means I can buy the cards here (europe) and use them for the NTSC camera I will rent there (america).
thank you very much


Robert Goodman
Wed 2 Sep 2009Link

P2 cards are the same everywhere. Yes you can change the frame rate in FCP. And HD is HD despite the frame rate changes.


alix de roten
Thu 3 Sep 2009Link

Ok great! thanks a lot for your help Robert.
For those who needs to understand the basic issue PAL/NTSC in HD, here is a very didactic article.
http://www.sharbor.com/tutorials/1674.html
Hope it can help others.


nick toscano
Tue 8 Sep 2009Link

new to this and figured someone here could answer questions. I'm filming a female boxer whos trying to make it to the next olympics. The backround music at the gym brought up some copy right issues and wasnt sure if i need to try and edit the backround music. This is my first film so not sure how the legalities work.


Robert Goodman
Wed 9 Sep 2009Link

if you don't edit a visual sequence to the background music, and it is in the background, it should fall into the fair use category. Read up on the rules for claiming fair use.


Andy Schocken
Wed 9 Sep 2009Link

and it depends where you plan to exhibit it. for background music, i wouldn't worry about online or festival usage- it's only likely to be an issue for broadcast or theatrical. not that the other uses are necessarily legal, but it's very unlikely that anyone will do anything about it.


Shelly Helgeson
Fri 11 Sep 2009Link

Hi Everyone! This started on the introduce yourself forum, but was told it would do to move it over here. Any help would be greatly, GREATLY appreciated. Thx – S

Now for a question: The doc I'm currently working needs a male actor to mimic the voice of one of our subjects for use as scratch narration. We'd like to get some one who can come very close to the person's real voice as we may use a cut with this narration to send into festival applications, etc. Does anyone know the best way to go about finding and hiring voice talent or actors? Our budget is small, so I'm sure we couldn't pay too competitively but, would try to offer a decent wage. I've posted on Backstage but was hoping for more suggestions. Does anyone know anything about contacting talent agencies or casting directors? Any advice would greatly help as I am totally inexperienced in dealing with actors. Thanks!


Michelle Ferrari
Sat 12 Sep 2009Link

It's been a long time since I worked with an actor I didn't already know, so I apologize in advance if this method proves outdated. That said, it used to be that talent agencies had CD compilations of their voice-over talent, which can help a lot in narrowing down the field. (SAG can provide a list of agencies. The commercial or voice-over division of a given agency is the one you'll want to contact.) Depending on the talent, their level of interest in the project, and your ability to negotiate with their representation, you can sometimes get voice-over talent for well below scale. The trick is to get around the agent. You might try writing a letter (sent to the agent, but addressed to the actor) that really talks up your project and states in no uncertain terms how vital the actor's participation is to its success, but does not mention pay. Try to get him/her interested first. In my experience, if an actor wants to do something, he does it, regardless of whether or not his agent thinks it's a good idea. Say in the letter (in a p.s., so it's the last thing he reads) that you'll be following up with his agent, and then do that. With any luck, the actor will have told his agent he wants in on the project and the money will be less of an issue.

All that said, if you're only planning to use the actor for scratch, you may be facing an uphill battle – when an actor forgoes money, it's usually in exchange for exposure. If you're not offering exposure, you'll definitely want to focus your energies on smaller agencies and lesser-known talent.


J. Christian Jensen
Thu 24 Sep 2009Link

STANFORD MFA IN DOCUMENTARY FILM

I'm in the process of selecting post-graduate documentary film schools. Is there anyone who has graduated from Stanford's MFA program that could make yourself known? Or is anyone in contact with other filmmakers who are significantly familiar with the program. I'd love to ask some questions.

Is this the best place to post such a question?


Marj Safinia
Thu 24 Sep 2009Link

Christian, since you're a member you'll get more response posting maybe here: Teaching Docs


Ted Fisher
Thu 24 Sep 2009Link

In reply to J. Christian Jensen's post on Wed 23 Sep 2009 :

I believe Michael Attie just joined after completing that program. He can probably give you some useful info. He posted recently in the Introductions forum.


J. Christian Jensen
Thu 24 Sep 2009Link

Fantastic. Thank you both.


Julian Samboma
Wed 30 Sep 2009Link

Thanks for the warm welcome, Doug. Nothing less than I expected!;)

Right. My first question. My next project is a 30-45 minute doc on an aspect of the UK economy. This is going to be my first major production, not like the previous two, which were essentially "teeth-cutting" exercises.

They were self-financed and I did everything myself. This time around, I am exploring the possibility of seeking funding from various sources – if for nothing else but for employing a top editor.

My question is how much do i factor into the budget for said editor,and how to find one?
Also, my camera is the pana gs400, an sd camera. Is it a good idea to include the cost of a decent hd cam in the budget?

I hope this is the best place to post this question. Thanks.

Best


Alexandra Branyon
Thu 1 Oct 2009Link

I am about to complete my first documentary. I can't find the original source of some of the photographs, which may have belonged to a person or may have been published in a newspaper, magazine or book. What can I do to protect myself? Any thoughts will be greatly appreciated.


Doug Block
Thu 1 Oct 2009Link

Julian, it's not the best place because you're now a member. Ask fundraising questions in the Fundraising (Europe) topic, camera questions in the Camera topic, etc.


Julian Samboma
Fri 2 Oct 2009Link

Thanks for that, Doug. Just finding my feet, as one does!


Maria Yatskova-Ibrahimova
Tue 13 Oct 2009Link

In reply to Alexandra Branyon's post on Wed 30 Sep 2009 :

I think you have to be a bit more specific for anyone to help answer that... what are the photos of? how did you get them? when were they taken? when and where were they published to the best of your knowledge? how do you intend to use them etc...

Edited Tue 13 Oct 2009 by Maria Yatskova-Ibrahimova

David W Grant
Tue 13 Oct 2009Link

I've completed, to my satisfaction, a speculative video essay, 28:45; edited on Final Cut Express. I want it to be technically as perfect as possible. Does that mean next step is 'audio sweetening' and/or 'color correction'? What are my options? Do I send the DVCAM cassette to a commercial house? Do rates vary widely? Is it best to do it locally?


Join this discussion now. You need to log in or register if you want to post.