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The Mentoring Room - Ask the Working Pros

This is a Public Topic geared towards first-time filmmakers. Professional members of The D-Word will come by and answer your questions about documentary filmmaking.

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Doug Block
Sun 19 Sep 2010Link

Manoj, here in the U.S. we're all but required to make a fundraising sample before we begin editing our film, usually somewhere between 5 and 15 minutes. We complain like hell, but it actually forces us to think through our story and work out structural issues. And it's a great opportunity to get feedback from others.

Since you're a D-Word member, this discussion actually belongs in the Works in Progress topic (the Mentoring Room is saved for Enthusiasts who have very limited access to the topics). There you'll find many other examples of samples our members are making.


Manoj Raj Pandey
Mon 20 Sep 2010Link

In reply to John Burgan's post on Sun 19 Sep 2010 : John yes! I directed it and plan to edit myself.I have around 150 hour footage.


John Burgan
Mon 20 Sep 2010Link

As Doug suggests, let's take this discussion to the Works in Progress topic


Daria Khlestkina
Thu 23 Sep 2010Link

Hello! Maybe it's a bit an offtop, but I wouldn't know where else to ask it, except Mentoring room.
I'm thinking about applying for Documentary Campus Master-school and my question is: what does "self-presentation clip" means? Does it mean a video of myself telling smth about myself, or it should be a video clip of my works, or a trailer of the film with which I'm applying? If smb knows, I would appreciate the suggestions very much. Thanks in advance, Daria Khlestkina


Jo-Anne Velin
Thu 30 Sep 2010Link

In reply to W. James Meagher's post on Fri 17 Sep 2010 :

James, if you need peer support, Winnipeg should be good. Documentary Organisation of Canada (DOC) is an association of Doc professionals (in the main), that also does a lot of legislation-related lobbying (read: there are lawyers involved). http://docorg.ca/ and here's the link to the Winnipeg chapter http://docorg.ca/en/chapters/winnipeg/about-winnipeg-chapter .... Someone on that list, or known to them, will know to deal with this, what releases you'll need, and similar fiddly things. Nice subject (your film), by the way.


Maranatha Hay
Fri 15 Oct 2010Link

Hi all,

I put together this short doc called "Surgeon of Hope". It's about two children who undergo pediatric heart surgery in Nicaragua.

I would love some feedback and words of wisdom if anyone has a few minutes. I realize that it's already published, out and about, but I'd like to know if something should be done differently for future films? Is there anything I should try to work on?

http://www.viewchange.org/videos/surgeons-of-hope


Linda Wasson
Sun 24 Oct 2010Link

Hi and help please ...

I come from a still doc photo background so working with others on a film is a new experience – it does help I'm in a film grad program but still...

the film I'm working on now is literally exploding with support from the community it's involving – the formerly incarcerated – and is blowing me away with its potential. of course I'm thrilled but for whatever reason my dp is slacking off, breaking scheduled shoots, and generally mucking things up in a major way. he's also a student and I'm not really sure how to go about handling this. we had a good one-on-one the other nite and he assured me he's on board but then turned around and screwed up again the next nite.

I've just posted an ad for a new dp but am wondering if anyone has any words about this situation? I've tried to include him as much as possible in decisions and progress of what's going on – I don't think I'm being too difficult or anything like that – he seriously seems to be sabotaging himself.

comments? suggestions?


Jo-Anne Velin
Mon 25 Oct 2010Link

... polite but firm separation as soon as you find a reliable DP. Maybe he just needs a little more maturity, or has too much to do to meet his course obligations (?), but if the shooting involves protagonists and others, his unreliability bruises your reputation with them. We all know in the pro, freelance, competitive world, he wouldn't be given a second chance easily.


Linda Wasson
Mon 25 Oct 2010Link

Jo-Anne – since you're the first one to reply – ok – I'm going to ask the q I didn't before – is this also happening because I'm female?


Jo-Anne Velin
Mon 25 Oct 2010Link

I wouldn't want to comment, I don't know the situation first-hand.


Doug Block
Mon 25 Oct 2010Link

Linda, it really doesn't matter what the reason is. If he's not doing the job, find someone who will. There are many good, young, hungry DP's out there. Not to mention, highly professional and experienced ones.


Linda Wasson
Tue 26 Oct 2010Link

ahh Doug – I understand what you mean but every time I post on craig's the posts are flagged and removed since I can't pay anything but a credit and a dvd.

we had another long talk last nite. he's definitely overwhelmed w/the subject matter. it's very intense for both of us; he's from S. Africa and old enough to remember apartheid. I can't imagine what's going on in his mind right now.

I'm kinda stumped I think at the responses here. Yes, I understand he's not doing his job but at the same time, this is a creative industry and especially in social justice documentary, I would think people would be offering a bit more insight into how to practice what we preach. altho I have to say, I've met some documentary filmmakers who seemed more ready to jump on the social justice bandwagon for the status symbolism than they are ready to put it into actual practice.

Jo-Anne – your 2nd comment is exactly what I'm referring to.

I'm here in this industry because I want to make a difference – if I can't put this into practice myself then what's the point?

and before anyone accuses me of anything, I'm only being honest and trying to open up a frank discussion in the mentoring room because I was hoping others would help me become the kind of director that shows the same compassion to my crew as I do to the participants/subjects in one of my films.


Doug Block
Tue 26 Oct 2010Link

I'm not suggesting you be an asshole about it, Linda. There are ways of letting someone go that are honest and humane, and it doesn't necessarily mean that you drop them from your life.

But what can I say, if mentoring or providing opportunities for your DP is more important to you than making the best film you possibly can than go for it. If making a difference is what you're after, I'd argue you'd be making a bigger difference to society by making a great film. And if your DP is more of a hindrance than a help in accomplishing that, I'd do what needs to be done. Again, it can be done compassionately.


Laura Moire Paglin
Tue 26 Oct 2010Link

It looks as if my previous comment was removed. Was it? It was in no way meant to be insensitive. As JoAnne says – without knowing the exact situation – it's difficult to provide specific suggestions other than practical advise about what one would do in such a general hypothetical situation. As a female director myself – I've concluded that it's a waste of time to speculate about whether one's gender commands more or less respect among crew members. I do believe however that it is a reasonable question to ask when dealing with documentary subjects.

I think sometimes being a director means behaving in ways that might feel contrary to one's nature. If you're generally a friendly laid back sensitive person who likes to avoid confrontation , it's sometimes a difficult thing to muster up the courage to tell someone firmly that things are not working out. But you have to do for the sake of your film – and that is really the only reason.


Linda Wasson
Tue 26 Oct 2010Link

Hi Laura – donno about your other post – maybe the server had a burp or something?

Doug – I hear you, just wanted to make it clear I didn't want to be too hardnosed and insensitive to other people's issues.

anyway – everything's moot now – my dp is now my former dp – he totally choked, flaked out, flew the coop, whatever you want to call it.

I think most of all I just wanted reassure myself I did my best. This has definitely been a learning experience. I've supervised people before, heck, I'm a teacher (tho just subbing presently) and just didn't want this to be business as usual.

I know now it wasn't, that it was him, for whatever reason, he couldn't cut it.

The only problem now is that it's the middle of the semester and everyone is working on someone's film or their own so I might be really screwed with this project. I have reached out so hopefully will be able to continue but am making a plan B just in case.

sigh, live and learn, huh?


Doug Block
Wed 27 Oct 2010Link

yup.

and laura, your post wasn't removed, at least as far as i know. what was so horrible that you wrote?


Jo-Anne Velin
Wed 27 Oct 2010Link

Everyone here recalls that this is a publicly-viewable topic, right?


Laura Moire Paglin
Wed 27 Oct 2010Link

Well Doug – I certainly didn't think so – a little tough perhaps – could have been construed as a bit sarcastic.

Jo Anne – thanks for reminding us! Truth be told, I had completely forgotten. Since Linda is a member, she should probably be posting this sort of thing in the production topic don't you think?


Doug Block
Wed 27 Oct 2010Link

Yes, actually.


Jo-Anne Velin
Wed 27 Oct 2010Link

This is mainly for Linda (LW, you may know this): If you are not logged into D-Word when you google your name, you will see what everyone with an internet access will see. (the host(s) can delete anything here that was added inadvertantly).


Linda Wasson
Sun 31 Oct 2010Link

uh ok ? I guess? am not sure what I'm supposed to acknowledge but yeah, I stay logged in...

and no, I don't think this should have been posted in production because I'm a grad student, this is a student film, and I'm new at a lot of this and was looking for mentor remarks, as opposed to mngmnt advice. as a business person, the answer was all too clear but I wanted to make sure I had everything else in mind to consider.

moving on, please see my next q


Linda Wasson
Sun 31 Oct 2010Link

this film I'm working on, about the formerly incarcerated, seems it's growing day by day and is becoming very exciting to work on.

in school they stress over and over again to concentrate on making shorts (this one will be maxed out at 20min) and IF there is interest and IF there is more to shoot, etc., etc., then consider using the short as an intro to the longer version.

I'm just wondering if anyone here has gone that route before – from a short to a longer version? and how did it work out? how did you make various decisions, like what to use in the short? how long did it take to make the longer version (and how long was it?), etc.


Ian Hawkins
Mon 1 Nov 2010Link

Hi everyone,
This is my first post for the D-Word but I wonder if you can help?

Sheffield DocFest have invited me to take part in their Mini-Meet Market at the end of the week. They chose and idea I proposed for a doc and now I have to pitch it to them on Friday. There's a panel of film and documentary professionals and I have just three minutes to pitch my idea.

I've never pitched before. Does anyone have any tips on pitching?
What should I concentrate on in such a short amount of time?

Thanks in advance of any help you can offer.


Nicola Lees
Mon 1 Nov 2010Link

Hi Ian
Congratulations – that's exciting!

First – and most importantly – make sure you really know your idea inside out. What length is it? What's the story? Where does the story begin and how does it get to the end? Over what period are you shooting? Whose point of view are you focusing on? Who are the key characters? How are you telling the story on screen? Using talking head interviews? Ob doc? Rare archive? Animation? And why does this story need to be told now? And indeed, why does this story best told as a documentary rather than a book, magazine feature or photo essay?

Once you've got it straight in your mind you can plan your pitch. Make sure you pitch the story and not the issue or research. The execs will be trying to 'see' your documentary as you pitch it, so make it unfold in their minds with some vivid visual details to bring it to life.

And you only have 3 mins so you don't have to tell the whole story from beginning to end (they'll start glazing over)- summarize it in one sentence e.g. "This is the story of...who...and then discovers that...until... happens". You can then fill in some of the details – how you came to the story, who the characters are and what their challenges are, for example.

The pitch should be a tease that leads to a dialogue. Once they start asking questions – shut up and listen. You can talk yourself out of a pitch by not listening and responding to feedback.

There are a number of articles on pitching here: http://www.tvmole.com/category/tvdevelopmenttips/pitching/page/2/ – scroll down the page and start with the one titled "Six Ways..."

Good luck – and enjoy the experience!


Ian Hawkins
Mon 1 Nov 2010Link

Hi Nicola, what a helpful answer! You've given real detail and that's what I was lacking. Plus 'shut up and listen' – great advice.

Thanks for the link too. I think my time this week will be spent talking to myself with a stopwatch.

Many thanks.


Doug Block
Tue 2 Nov 2010Link

Along the lines of "shut up and listen," whatever you do don't be defensive. If one of the commissioning editors says only a martian would be interested in your film, nod as if the person is a certified genius. Good luck, Ian.


Sebastian Serrano
Wed 10 Nov 2010Link

Hi, i have a question about how much Natgeo or History pays for a chapter of 50 min for the US market. Can you help me with it?
Thank you


John Burgan
Thu 11 Nov 2010Link

Welcome, Sebastian. Everyone at The D-Word registers with their full name, so please add your surname to your profile.


Sebastian Serrano
Thu 11 Nov 2010Link

Hello John, nice to meet you. Can you help me with my question? Thank you


John Burgan
Thu 11 Nov 2010Link

I'm afraid I can't, Sebastian, but hopefully one of our many members can...


Nicola Lees
Thu 11 Nov 2010Link

Hi Sebastian
Visit Documentarytelevision.com for all kinds of useful channel budget information. Here's the entry on History: http://documentarytelevision.com/2010/03/10/what-does-history-pay-for-programming/


Jason Perryman
Fri 12 Nov 2010Link

Well this seems weird posting in here but after trying t figure this place out, I was told to post my questions here.

So I have made a 23 minute DOCUMENTARY on TIGER SHARKS that I need help trying to DISTRIBUTE. It's about diving with Tigers and then how they get killed in the beach nets, wounding their population etc. It's categorized as part amateur part professional in that it was shot on a home movie SD camera, but I got professional people in post production on it, animation, music etc.

How do I distribute this film to it's potential? What Distribution companies or Acquisition companies can I find to get this film to? How do I find these companies? If so, what's the process of approaching them?

I'm interested in getting this shown anywhere. TV, internet any small channels or being inflight movies etc. I know there's loads of different avenues that could show this film. Does anyone know how to do this or where to basically start? Any help would be a MAJOR push, thank you.

(Nat Geo turned me down. Discovery are useless, can't find a proper person to get it to there)


Rick Dillwood
Sat 13 Nov 2010Link

Has anyone had any experience with CFMDC (Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre)?

I got an email from them expressing interest in a short doc I made last year (exciting!), but I wondered how many of these kinds of offers are legitimate.

They're asking for a $75 lifetime membership fee and a list of deliverables.

Any help would be appreciated,

Rick

Edited Sat 13 Nov 2010 by Rick Dillwood

Jo-Anne Velin
Sat 13 Nov 2010Link

Perhaps contact the DOC association of Canada, either the HQ in Toronto or the regional people, and ask who knows what, or find out from CFMDC which filmmakers are with them and talk to the producers or directors. DOC can help connect you with people who know more, or you may hear about their informal reputation (especially if there are "issues"). Hopefully this is a good outfit – I have no opinion. Good luck!


Mark Wojahn
Sat 13 Nov 2010Link

I am starting an edit with some HD files on an external drive and am not able to open the files up in QuickTime Player10 or in Final cut Pro 5.1.4. When I double click on the file to open it up in the viewer I get the warning bubble that says "Codec not found. You may be using a compression type w/out the corresponding hardware card" I am running an Intel imac on OX 10.6.4. Has anyone had this problem too? Whats the fix? Thanks.


James Longley
Sat 13 Nov 2010Link

In reply to Rick Dillwood's post on Fri 12 Nov 2010 :

Personally, I wouldn't trust any distributor that sends you an email and asks you to pay them money to distribute your film. A good distributor could offer an advance against future earnings if they actually anticipate being able to distribute your film in a mutually profitable way. But a distributor that asks you to pay them is just a scam operation.


Timoty Gibbs
Sun 14 Nov 2010Link

Can anyone talk about the Oprah Winfrey Documentary Club that's premiering in 2011? I understand she's featuring one documentary a month? Anyone think this is a good opportunity? I can't imagine how having Oprah involved with your film could be bad. How can one get a film to Oprah?


James Longley
Sun 14 Nov 2010Link

Catapult.


Doug Block
Sun 14 Nov 2010Link

Timoty, I think you submit through Annie Roney at RoCo Films.

Jason, wish we could be more helpful with suggestions about distributing your short. They're just very tough to get out there, and you already contacted the two most logical broadcasters.


James Longley
Sun 14 Nov 2010Link

Sorry to be flip. Doug is correct, as usual. That's why he runs the joint.

Edited Sun 14 Nov 2010 by James Longley

Timoty Gibbs
Sun 14 Nov 2010Link

Thanks, Doug, I'll investigate. Have you heard anything about this "club"? I'd think if someone like Oprah was looking for documentaries, it would be another great broadcast opportunity but no one seems to be talking about it. Do filmmakers not know about it or is it a bad thing?


James Longley
Sun 14 Nov 2010Link

It is a good thing. Any invitation to watch documentary films is a good thing. Shun the Frumious Bandersnatch! But watch docs. We live in the real world.

Edited Sun 14 Nov 2010 by James Longley

Jason Osder
Sun 14 Nov 2010Link

Here is info on the OWN documentary project – you need to click into the Flash site from this link.

http://www.rocofilms.com/

The "club" is based on the book club: one doc per month on cable TV and DVD mail order – an invitation to "get off the couch" have a discussion, do something.

I agree with James says: a good thing.

To me, it's sort of like a new model: traditional, digital, hybrid, Oprah.


Laura Moire Paglin
Mon 15 Nov 2010Link

My hunch is – to be broadcast by "the club' that your a doc already has to be successful – a hit on the festival scene, awards, nominations, etc. – I could be wrong of course....


Timoty Gibbs
Wed 17 Nov 2010Link

Funny that an announcement was just made about acquitions to the OWN club.

http://www.indiewire.com/article/2010/11/15/own_picks_up_three_docs_for_spring_debut#

Three of the acquisitions are One Lucky Elephant, 65_RedRoses and Most Valuable Players.


S.Tavaris Belle
Sun 21 Nov 2010Link

I cant remember where I got the information from on the website but a post was made about documentary researchers with there name and contact information. Could somebody help me find it again? I tried using the research tool but couldnt find it


Nadia Hennrich
Tue 30 Nov 2010Link Tag

In reply to Bill Jackson's post on Mon 23 Aug 2010 :

Hi there Bill, I haven't figured out how to post a new thread here, so i am replying to you hoping someone will see this post: fact is I know there are some sound studios specialising on inexpensive sound mix for docs in LA, would you know any places? sorry to bug & thx

Edited Tue 30 Nov 2010 by Nadia Hennrich

Christopher Wong
Tue 30 Nov 2010Link Tag

for my sound mix, i used a really great guy who has a nice little studio in downtown LA. his name is Nathan Smith and he runs a company called NL3 Audio. very inexpensive rates, and he is absolutely obsessive-compulsive about good, clean sound. we had some troublesome air conditioning and street noises in various scenes, and Nathan did a great job with it. tell him i referred you! you can check out his work at www.nl3audio.com


Derek A. Reuter
Fri 3 Dec 2010Link

Hello, my name is Derek and althought I have commissioned documentaries and non-fiction film work before. I am now taking a step to be D.I.Y. and do one myself for a bit of a change of pace and discovery.

I would deeply appreciate any help and advice experienced people like yourselves can offer someone as crazy and adventurous as me. I do enjoy diving head first into a new medium that I have no previous formal training. If anything this allows me to innovate, but none-the-less there are plenty of mistakes I could make that could greatly hinder the products production/budget/success etc and nothing is more important than the product itself and its purpose.

My first question has to do with affordable resources and crew suppliments.
I am mapping out the film schedule, travel arrangements, and appointments with talent and talking heads. Already there is multiple conflicts with traveling with my current DP. So understanding that I can't always drag him with me to every opportunity to film or meet with an individual.

So is there a network out there where I can cherry pick videographers, sound engineers, etc that are affordable or willing to do in-kind work from various parts of the country?

My next question has to do with fiscal agents. I am currently investigating and informing my associates about CID (Center for Independent Documentaries) and am in love with what I have found. Especially as someone who is normally playing the role of being the Fiscal Agent/nonprofit resouce. But these relationships can be competative and there is no guarentee that the board and staff will feel inspired to work with us on our topic/film. Are their other non-fiction film organizations that have a good track record and are experienced at being a fiscal agent? Certainly a documentary based FA would have much greater advice and resources to guide or film to reach the market and viewers.

Last but not least. Considering we still have a few months before filming starts. I have yet to invest budget monies towards the bulk of video and sound equipment needed. Our documentary will be taping multiple live performances/jam out sessions, talking head interviews, stills, and moving shots.

Rigs and all aside. We are currently looking at a Canon EOS Mark ii for filming and stills, can anyone recommend a sound setup that can pair with this camera that will caption quality sound? Or better yet, recommend a video/audio pair that you have found most effective in capturing the essense of asceticism in video and sensation of good sound at a comparable price.

I would appreciate any and all advice on these questions and am always willing to be of service should you have any questions for areas I am experienced in. Agreed these are more questions for the member area but I have no creditals thus far in the genre so membership is doubtful.

Maybe in trade of consulting I can help in your films with an environmental, activist, natural resource management, policy, elections, music festivals, community organizing, nonprofit themes.

Always open and always willing,

Derek A. Reuter


John Burgan
Fri 3 Dec 2010Link

Derek – when your schedule has firmed up, feel free to post your crew requests here in Public Classifieds .

Additionally you can search by location/job at http://www.mandy.com/1/filmtvservices.cfm

Hopefully in this manner you'll find some competent and affordable collaborators. Not quite sure what "in-kind work" you're offering, though.

Edited Fri 3 Dec 2010 by John Burgan

Derek A. Reuter
Fri 3 Dec 2010Link

Thank's john, logging the links now.

I often do things for an altruistic purpose and try to cut costs everywhere I can so that the objective and community benefits are achieved or not compremised. Volunteering professional services on a chartiable or education project is in-kind time. If possible maybe some of these videographers would be willing to help for a day for recognition on the credit rolls, webiste, etc instead of wanting a chunk of the funding. By having a nonprofit umbrella the project and leverage their designation it allows for any person to get a tax write-off (in some cases monies paid later by foundation/invoices not project budget) for the hours, materials, supplies, services supplied towards the project.


Derek A. Reuter
Fri 3 Dec 2010Link

As for "in-kind" work I am offering. Simply ask, each situation I have encountered in regards for help has always been different. If I am unable to help myself I may have a list of resources to direct you to.


Linda Wasson
Fri 3 Dec 2010Link

I'm confused about the various "no student films" or "no student funding" or "film must not have been made while a student" etc. ad nauseum....

what's this about exactly? and does the fact that I'm a student and making a film, even outside of class, automatically target me as someone not eligible for funding??

it's sooo frustrating and just a bit unnerving... the current film I'm seeking finishing funds for and other guidance – it's grown outside of my original class project and truly taken on a life of its own. I'm happy of course and no longer see it as a student film (again, am not sure what that is even supposed to mean!).

can someone help explain this to me please??


Jo-Anne Velin
Fri 3 Dec 2010Link

As far as I know, student films are classified as this because they are made with film school resources. If this disqualifies you for certain finishing funds, maybe the school can point you to an alternative. Take this up in the NAmerica funding topic?


Linda Wasson
Sat 4 Dec 2010Link

Jo-Anne, thanks but I'm still not clear what exactly constitutes a "student film."

also it raises a new question – what you said about school resources – why would that make any difference?

and no, my school knows no more resources than anyone else.


Linda Wasson
Sat 4 Dec 2010Link

*this is posted here because the term "student film" is used in a number of designations not just for funding, i.e., film festivals, etc. sometimes there's even a separate category.

maybe every instance "student film" has its own definition??? it's so exasperating....!


Ramona Diaz
Sat 4 Dec 2010Link

Hi Linda, it's really not that complicated. A student film is a film for which you received credit toward a degree using the school's resources – be it their equipment or their editing facilities, etc.


Linda Wasson
Sat 4 Dec 2010Link

so why the discrimination? who cares whose facilities are used? what's the dif?

and what about a film (such as the one I'm in the midst of now) where it started as a class project but outgrew it and now I'm finishing it separate from class?

some situations have also used the designation "no students" rather than "student film" which makes me feel like my work is somehow automatically disqualified just because I'm a film student.


Derek A. Reuter
Tue 7 Dec 2010Link

Hello members, anyone have any suggestions as Gaffers, DPs, or Directors what lighting/camera combination has worked best for you?


Sahand Sahebdivani
Tue 7 Dec 2010Link

Hi Derek,

It somewhat depends on what type of shots you're making. Talking heads inside will obviously need a different appreach than outside shots. You're also constrained by your budget. Care to tell a bit more what kind of project you're embarking on?


Derek A. Reuter
Tue 7 Dec 2010Link

Filming subject is upon American Folk Music from the region and its events. From Old Time to modern emerging genres.

Most interview shots would be scheduled in home, office visits, classooms, archive areas, and outdoors. The other shots will mostly be from outdoor summer events, darkly lit venues, front porches, barns, and in home band jams. At times we will take shots of nature, buildings, homes, and scenes of natural discourse and activities of the human talent and scholars. Of course always expect random opportunities.

Budget most likely won't allow for multiple cameras and light setups but has yet to be invested on equipment so currently very flexible for any recommendations.


Derek A. Reuter
Tue 7 Dec 2010Link

At the very least I want to be able to do a light triangle w/background light that gives a good rim on the subject and would be a bit too much during the night. Any suggestions on a package or combination that would work well and is travel friendly?


James Longley
Wed 8 Dec 2010Link

Derek – here's a pro bono promotional video I made for a school in Pakistan using a Canon 7D and a monopod. Edited using Final Cut Pro on a laptop – it was almost free to make it, apart from a few days of my time. I'm not sure that's exactly the style you're going for, but it's cheap and fast and fairly easy.

http://www.vimeo.com/12450414


Jessamy Meyer
Thu 16 Dec 2010Link

Hi,
I am starting to edit a trailer together for a doc project in the beginning stages of editing. I need to get the trailer to show and help with some financing. The doc is very archival heavy and has a main character with a lot of published philosophies on various topics of interest to the film. So, the director and I are playing with the idea of including text in the trailer so I'm looking for some advice on maybe good examples of films that use text in a way that is informative and also stylistic interesting and significant. Beyond examples, any experiences with using text/quotes in films? Thanks in advance for any feedback!


Daniel McGuire
Fri 17 Dec 2010Link

In reply to James Longley's post on Tue 7 Dec 2010 :

Wow, what a beautiful piece, James.


Kristen Kellogg
Mon 20 Dec 2010Link

Hi everyone. I am just breaking into the world of film making, and I have a great idea on a unique story in Bali and how a couple that moved there is changing the way we eat throughout the world. There is much more here, but that is the gist. They have responded to my interest and want to know my proposed plan. I have never made a film before, and want to find someone to work with me on this project who is a cinematographer. Also I need to get back to them and let them know my ideas this week. Any suggestions how to approach this? Thanks, Kristen


Bill Jackson
Mon 20 Dec 2010Link

In reply to Nadia Hennrich's post on Mon 29 Nov 2010 :
Hi, Nadia. Sorry I didn't get right back to you. I have been on a couple of projects that have consumed all of my time, and I haven't been on D-Word for several weeks.

If you still haven't mixed yet, get in touch with me. My schedule opens up after tomorrow.


Daniel McGuire
Mon 20 Dec 2010Link

In reply to Kristen Kellogg's post on Mon 20 Dec 2010 :

Well, I just got back from shooting in Bali 2 weeks ago, and currently live about an hour from you, so perhaps we should talk. dan at gmail dot com


Kristen Kellogg
Mon 20 Dec 2010Link

In reply to Daniel McGuire's post on Mon 20 Dec 2010 :

Hi Dan. I am currently in Australia, but do you have skype? Maybe we could have a chat on there? Or shoot me an email kellogg.kristen (at) gmail.com Would love to hear about what you just wrapped up as well.


Kristen Kellogg
Mon 20 Dec 2010Link

Can anyone recommend any great websites (other than this one) where I can get help on how to make my first documentary?


John Burgan
Mon 20 Dec 2010Link

Not sure a website or a book can replace the experience you will gain by launching in and actually making a short doc exercise – ideally something in your own back yard – walk before you run. I presume you have access to a basic DV camera and edit software? How about a 2-minute portrait of "someone at work" – that's always a classic subject. Try to interpret it in visual terms, rather than relying on interview/talking heads.

Also search for "documentary filmmaking" on amazon.com – check out Andy Glynne's Documentaries and How to Make Them and Michael Rabiger's much more comprehensive Directing the Documentary


Timoty Gibbs
Wed 22 Dec 2010Link

Can anyone talk about educational distribution? Who are the game players? Can it be lucrative? Is it a difficult market to crack?


Justine Jacob
Wed 22 Dec 2010Link

In reply to Kristen Kellogg's post on Mon 20 Dec 2010 :

Documentors started about a year ago and have a lot of resources on their page. I loved their film, Shakespeare behind bars and they are really nice folks in general. They do charge for most things, but looks like you can do a subscription as well.

http://www.documentaryhowto.com/


Christopher Wong
Wed 22 Dec 2010Link

In reply to Kristen Kellogg's post on Mon 20 Dec 2010 :

If you need to come up with a proposal quick, watch as many documentaries as you can. Make sure you have a good mix of different genres, old and new. Then, figure out what you want to borrow from each, and start conceiving the proposal from there. A quick list of varied docs might be:
SALESMAN (Maysles Brothers)
GRIZZLY MAN (Werner Herzog)
HARLAN COUNTY USA (Barbara Kopple)
IRAQ IN FRAGMENTS (James Longley)
DARWIN'S NIGHTMARE (Hubert Sauper)
BOWLING FOR COLUMBINE (Michael Moore)

this list could go on forever... but other than making docs, watching docs is the best way to learn.


Kristen Kellogg
Wed 22 Dec 2010Link

John-Thanks for the book recommendations. I read Documentaries and How to Make Them by Andy Glynne today. A lot of clarification and great insight.

Christopher-I have been watching a variety of films the last few days and it's been a tremendous help.

Justine-many thanks for the site! So many helpful hints!

Thanks everyone for helping me take the necessary steps to making my vision become a reality.


Jaggy Singh
Thu 23 Dec 2010Link

hey...

sorry for the loud introduction.

hope everyone is well.

I am currently in my final year at university, over here in the UK.
I am studying Film production and Technology, and am working on a dissertation, which is based on, the technology used for cinema release documentaries.

I have started the research, and have noticed, i am getting much more information to do with the theory, artistic and issues and debates in documentary, more than the technology side of documentary film making.

I was wondering if anyone could assist me with any articles, books or websites I could look at which focus on the technology side of film making for documentaries in cinema.

Also, I'm amazed at how there are so many different people on this website. wow! this is like a small community within it self.

Also, are there any camera men, sound recorders and editors and cinematographers, which i could maybe interview through email, just so i can get an insight of those who work in the industry, with first hand experience, that would be so great.

if anyone can help, that would be great.

Thank you for your time.

Take care


Jaime Cruz
Thu 23 Dec 2010Link

Hi Jaggy

Perhaps your interest for this topic is only about docs production in the "first world". Anyway, you will find a very broad range of technologies used in docs, from the oldies (but goodies) dvx 100´s to the DSLR´S. So maybe your question should be more in the perspective of "how and why" the diverse options of cameras, sound gear, etc., are being used by documentaries filmakers. Well, is just a suggestion.
Saludos


Jaggy Singh
Thu 23 Dec 2010Link

In reply to Jaime Cruz's post on Thu 23 Dec 2010 :

Hey Jaime,

Thank you for writing back man, appreciate that! yh I am looking into those camera's at the moment. I am analysing the technologies through time, in reference to films. from the 20's to the 60's and to the 21st century. so I am looking at films such as, man with a movie camera, gimme shelter and touching the void. I want to look at why 35mm were used, why did people stop using them, then 16mm came in to action and now the 35mm is getting back in documentaries. I know the general idea, but i want to get in to more detail. also what the future may look like for documentaries. i wish i could change the title, I really do...but I am stuck with it now, so I just have to get on with it and learn to love it.

cheers Jaime!


Bill Kerrigan
Fri 24 Dec 2010Link

Jaggy... because of my age, I might be able to help.
When I started... feature docs were shot on 35mm.
I filmed some pickup shots for 'Janis' and 'The Man Who Skied Down Everest'.

If you wish, you can write me off forum.


Jaggy Singh
Fri 24 Dec 2010Link

In reply to Bill Kerrigan's post on Thu 23 Dec 2010 :

hey Bill, hope your well.

That's great.Seriously, I would love to hear from you, and your work. Thank you for replying back to my post, really do appreciate it Bill.

Is it possible I could maybe get your email add, so we can talk about this?

Thank You


John Burgan
Fri 24 Dec 2010Link

You'll find the email address of any D-Word member if you click on their name or photo.


Doug Block
Fri 24 Dec 2010Link

Actually, not sure Enthusiasts can.


John Burgan
Fri 24 Dec 2010Link

Whoops. Too much sherry with the mince pies.


Bill Kerrigan
Fri 24 Dec 2010Link

In reply to Jaggy Singh's post on Thu 23 Dec 2010 :

Jaggy, please email me here:
kerrigan at mac.com


Jaggy Singh
Sat 25 Dec 2010Link

hey, thanks for the help lads.

thats great Bill, ill email you now.

Merry Christmas everyone


Christina Antonakos-Wallace
Mon 3 Jan 2011Link

Hi there,

I recently completed a 20 minute version of the feature-length film I am directing (www.withwingsandroots.com) which is targeted for educational use. The film comparatively explores the immigration debate in the U.S. and Europe through the stories of children of immigrants in Berlin and New York. The film was shot half in Germany, and a very big German educational distributor is interested. They have given us a generic contract to look over, but I have no idea of the terms are decent or terrible, plus it is in German! Basically, they seem to be offering us no money upfront, but 50% of all profit from sales. They would get exclusive access to all German-speaking countries and Goethe Institutes for three years. I know that I need to find a German entertainment lawyer to speak with before signing anything, but it would be great if anyone could share any of the terms they have gotten in educational distribution contracts, or even send a sample contract.
Thank you so much for your help!!!


Doug Block
Mon 3 Jan 2011Link

Christina, you're a member so you shouldn't post this in The Mentoring Room. Especially since it's a public topic and therefore open to Google searches and the like. This belongs in the Marketing and Distribution topic.


Nicola Lees
Mon 3 Jan 2011Link

Christina – you could try contacting Christoph Fey – he's a a German entertainment lawyer based in Berlin and has been very helpful in the past.He works for a company Unverzagt Von Have and his contact details are easily Googled.


Jeff Girard
Sun 16 Jan 2011Link

Hello,

Advice sought: Least expensive PC for video editing programs

I am seeking help finding the least expensive PC laptop capable of running Pinnacle Studio video editing programs. I’m on the low income side (especially after becoming unemployed) so I am working with modest equipment.

Because I am couch surfing, I need to stick with a laptop, not a PC.

I’ve tried several other editing programs such as Vegas, Adobe, etc., and I’ve tried iMovie on the Mac. Pinnacle works best for me. My current laptop, a Dell I bought in 2009, cannot handle my HD video editing. I am using a Kodak Zi8 camera.

The system requirements are at: http://www.pinnaclesys.com/PublicSite/us/Products/Consumer+Products/Home+Video/Studio+Family/

There are three main versions and all 3 appear to have different requirements:
Studio HD
Studio Ultimate
Studio Ultimate Collection

The graphics card requirement is the same for all of three.

I’m a lean quick on my own how to use document, photo, and video editing programs for creative purposes. I am however clueless about the tech stuff.

I am getting unemployment checks and money is tight. However, I believe in myself enough to take a gamble and spend up to $1,000 on a laptop.

I need help though because I'm not good at the tech stuff and don't want to get ripped off at the stores. So far, Best Buy, Fry’s and my computer savvy friends have all recommended different machines. I’m hoping that at some point I’ll hear the same recommendation a few times.

At least at Best Buy and Wal-Mart there are no re-stocking fees.

Thanks! I appreciate your time and help,

-Jeff

System Requirements for Studio Ultimate Collection

* Windows ® 7, Windows Vista ® (SP2),Windows XP (SP3)
* Intel ® Pentium ® or AMD Athlon ™ 1.8 GHz (2.4 GHz or higher recommended)
– Intel Core ™ 2 Duo 2.4 GHz required for AVCHD*
– Intel Core ™ 2 Quad 2.66 GHz or Intel Core ™ i7 required
for AVCHD* 1920
* 1 GB system memory recommended, 2 GB required for AVCHD*
* DirectX ® 9 or 10 compatible graphics card with 64 MB (128 MB or higher recommended) – 128 MB required for Red Giant Magic Bullet Looks Plug-in: Pixelshader 2 required, Intel GMA integrated graphics not supported. – 256 MB required for HD and AVCHD*
* DirectX 9 or higher compatible sound card
* 3,6 GB of disk space
* DVD-ROM drive to install software
* Accessory:
o CD burner for creating Video CDs or Super Video CDs (S-VCDs)
o DVD burner for creating DVD and AVCHD* discs
o Blu-ray burner for creating Blu-ray discs*
o Sound card with surround sound output required for preview of surround sound mixes*

Input Options

* Capture from DV, HDV and Digital8 camcorders or VCRs (requires a FireWire ® ; port)Capture from analog camcorders, 8 mm, HI 8, VHS, SVHS, VHS-C, SVHS-C, or VCRs (NTSC/PAL/SECAM). (requires Pinnacle or Dazzle video hardware)
* Import from AVCHD* and other file based Camcorders, Digital Still Cameras, Mobile Devices and Webcams via USB

Output Options

* Output to DV, HDV or Digital8 tape (requires camcorder with FireWire Input port and a PC with a DV/FireWire port)
* Output to analog videotape (requires DirectShow compatible device with video output)

Import Formats

* Video: AVCHD*, BD Blu-ray*, DV, HDV, AVI, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, DivX ® , MPEG-4, 3GP(MPEG-4), WMV, Non-encrypted DVD titles (incl. DVD-VR/+VR), QuickTime ® ; (DV, MPEG-4, H.264*)
* Audio: MP3, MPA, WAV, AC3*, WMA
* Graphic: BMP, GIF, JPG, PCX, PSD, TGA, TIF, WMF, PNG, J2K

Export Formats

* AVCHD*, BD Blu-ray*, HD-DVD, DVD (DVD-R, DVD-RW, DVD+R or DVD+RW, dual layer), S-VCD, Video CD (VCD)
* Apple ® iPod ® , Sony ® ; PSP/PS3, Nintendo ® Wii, Microsoft ® Xbox compatible formats*
* DV, HDV, AVI, DivX*, RealVideo ® 8, WMV, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4*, Flash, 3GP*, WAV, MP3*, QuickTime ® (SD format) files
* Dolby ® Digital 2 channel and 5.1 channel audio*


Jeff Girard
Sun 16 Jan 2011Link

Hello,

Advice sought: Microphones for Kodak Zi8 camera & the iTouch.

Also, any recommendations for clip on mics, attached mics, or wireless mics to enable the recording of at least 3 people for the Kodak Zi8 camera & the iTouch?

Thanks,

-Jeff


Linda Wasson
Mon 17 Jan 2011Link

In reply to Jeff Girard's post on Sat 15 Jan 2011 :

the oldest and still the best place on the web for all things computer-related is www.pricewatch.com

originally in DOS, pricewatch used to list real-time prices with discounts as they appeared online. nowdays it provides links to both retail and online computer supply stores.

ok, that's one option. #2 is my own personal suggestion: you want a laptop and new ones are like new cars: the moment you bring it home the price decreases about 50% – because they are all overpriced. what to do? a couple of options – you can build your own – since you aren't working and have some time, this is a real option and w/price watch and Fry's nearby...

another option: go for the refurbished model. there are SO many out there – I bought a Samsung notebook in 2003 that was about 2 years old; new it was priced around $5000 because that's what they cost back then. I paid about $250 for it and it was loaded with goodies. I was happy if it would last 6 months – guess what – I still have it and it still boots up just fine. Over time tho, memory allocations increased and I can't upgrade for a reasonable price so it's not really practical to use anymore; I just don't want it to wind up in a landfill somewhere or I'd chunk it.

which is another good reason to buy refurbished – there's simply nothing wrong with recycling a computer – many are still worth keeping around. Just check and double-check your hardware requirements, ask about warranties and you're good to go. the cheapest models come with no operating system which if you already have one, you can just use that.

if you can register for a class somewhere, you can qualify for academic pricing on software which will also save you $$

good luck and hang in there.


Jack Hunter Cohen
Wed 19 Jan 2011Link

I'm looking for a Line Producer for a feature doc. Where do I go? The film is on Women and Men and their relationships and will be structured around interviews shot overseas and in the states in several locations. Is there an appropriate forum here to put it out there?


Eli Brown
Wed 19 Jan 2011Link

Members Classifieds is a good place to start. You could also put it on the public classifieds – and there are a lot of media-centric job sites (mandy.com, mediabistro.com, craigslist, even) if you're just doing a random sort of cattle-call for resumés...


Doug Block
Wed 19 Jan 2011Link

Just remember, Jack, that the public classifieds is open to Google searches. So be careful about what information you're giving out.


Ashley Hillis
Thu 20 Jan 2011Link

Hello,

This is my first posting so I hope I do this correctly :)

Advice sought: Recommendation of films to watch for reference

I'm hoping someone might be able to recommend a documentary that successfully tells a character driven story while also exploring this individual's culture and highlights other characters from his/her world. I'm not looking for a traditional biographical piece (I understand my description might come across sounding that way). This is a silly example, but it might help in understanding the type of film I'm looking for... (I just made this up so it might be totally ridiculous, but hopefully it will serve as a helpful illustration.)

Example:
A once celebrated under water basket weaver is looking to make a comeback. She decides to build a store in which she will sell her baskets and through the process of building the shop, she will face some of the demons from her past.

In order for the film to be accessible to the everyday viewer, the film must put the story in context – tell a bit about the history of under water basket weaving and why it is significant to some. We should also learn about others in the field so that we are able to see what makes this particular weaver different (or maybe the same) as others out there.

Does this make sense? Can anyone point me in the direction of a film that follows a similar path?

Thank you so much for your help!
Ashley


Doug Block
Thu 20 Jan 2011Link

Ashley, first of all, welcome to The D-Word. And bravo for leaping right in with a post. You did it fine, except that the Mentoring Room is mainly for those we call Enthusiasts and the professional members rarely hang out here.

We don't encourage double-posting but in this case we'll make an exception. You should post this again in the Documentary Film topic and you'll probably get a good deal more feedback.

Also want to encourage you to tell us a bit more about yourself in the Introduce Yourself topic.


Ashley Hillis
Fri 28 Jan 2011Link

Hi Doug,
Thank you so much for responding. I will make my way over to the Documentary Film area and see about posting there.
Thank you for your help.
Ashley


Martin Carel
Sun 30 Jan 2011Link

We're about to go into the editing phase for our indie documentary. For the post-workflow process (using a Mac Book Pro 2.4GHz 4GB), we're about to transcode the (Canon t2i) H264 files into APR422 files using MPEG Streamclip. This seemed to be the best practice at the beginning of year 2010.

2 questions:

  • is it still the best practice today?
  • while editing in FCP, is it realistic to source the video files from an external FireWire800 HD? I was hosting my video files on an external USB 2.0 HD on a previous project, and it's just too slow. So I'm wondering if FireWire800 would do it or if I need to have the video files on my local MBP drive.

Thanks in advance,

Martin
http://winobrothers.com


Laura Moire Paglin
Sun 30 Jan 2011Link

Martin – I'm not the tech geek that some of the filmmakers are (so perhaps other will have something to add)- but there are some other options besides MPEG stream clip. EOS Plugin allows you to use FCP 'log and capture settings' to transcode files.This is supposed to be faster and also allows you to imbed timecode onto your footage. Some have had problems with it however. Magic Bullet Grinder allows you to simultaneously create both ProRes Proxy files and higher ProrRes files simultaneously and creates timecode. Oh but I just noticed that you're transcoding to something called APR422. I've never heard of that. Just about everyone I've talked to uses Prores. Yes FireWire800 should be fine. FYI – you need FCP 7 to convert to Prores Proxy (which takes up a lot less space). I think the timecode option offered by EOS plugin and Grinder is a huge advantage over MPEG streamclip.

Edited Sun 30 Jan 2011 by Laura Moire Paglin

Errol Webber
Sun 30 Jan 2011Link

Laura, APR422 = "Apple ProRes 422"


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