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The Mentoring Room - Ask the Working Pros

This is a Public Topic geared towards first-time filmmakers. Professional members of The D-Word will come by and answer your questions about documentary filmmaking.

Jennifer MacDonald
Thu 21 May 2009Link

Yeah.. I was thinking about making one while keeping my day job. I would want to do the writting, researching and setting up interviews and shots. I think that would be more the producer side? I think I understand that there isn't just a company that churns out films.. it's more a labor of love with money making jobs on the side?


Georgi James
Sun 24 May 2009Link

I've enjoyed this week so much. Thanks.

I would like to use a 70s theme song for my film. Do you know how I go about getting permission to use the song.

G.


David Mcilvride
Sun 24 May 2009Link

There's quite a few companies (and freelance individuals) who specifically work on music clearances .. they're the best resource for clearing music.


Andy Schocken
Sun 24 May 2009Link

In reply to Jennifer MacDonald's post on Thu 21 May 2009 :

I think the best way to go about making a living with documentaries is to target one specific role, and hone your craft. You'll rarely make much money directing or producing docs, but you can do fine earning a day-rate as an editor/sound recordist/cinematographer... So I would focus on that, and make your own films on the side. Eventually, that part of your work will start taking precedence.


John Burgan
Sun 24 May 2009Link Tag

In reply to Georgi James's post on Sun 24 May 2009 :

Be prepared how expensive this can be, especially for well-known hits. Check out this BBC guide to clearing music rights


Steven Dhoedt
Tue 26 May 2009Link

I would like to know a bit more about release forms for documentaries, for locations and for people.

To what extend are they really necessary?
I have tons of interviews with people who all agreed in advance (generally by email or over the phone) to participate in my film. They have a clear understanding of what the film is about. The fact that they do a one hour interview with me already proves that they are willing to participate, right? Some of them have signed release forms, other ones haven't (yet), simply because we didnt have any at hand at the time. should i contact all these people again and get them sign this paper?

Also, what about people who are in the shot (e.g. street shots, shots on conferences...you know, b-roll footage that establishes a location etc. surely it would be impossible to go up to every single one of them in the shot and get them sign a paper?

For you documentary makers out there, what's your views on release forms? I often find it rather threatening to the subject I am interviewing, to do an interview and then shove a paper under their nose with lots of legal terms. I think it can frighten a lot of people, even if you tell them it's just a pro forma document.

And what about logo's and advertisements that are in the frame, even in the background? does all these have to be cleared as well? Is this only needed for the US, or do European and Asian distributors and broadcasters also demand this?

looking forward to hear your views on this


Tom Dziedzic
Tue 26 May 2009Link

Stephan, I try to get written releases from everyone I interview and who may be in the film. Or if it's a quick spontaneous interview or scene, I get a verbal agreement while the camera is rolling before or after the interview.

I can't recommend this book enough, it has helped me tremendously: Clearance & Copyright: Everything You Need to Know for Film and Television by Michael C. Donaldson. It's an essential reference book to have around.


Peter Brauer
Tue 26 May 2009Link

If you want your movie to end up on television or in theaters, you generally need to have a release from basically everyone in the film. You can use a very simply worded release that people will understand. So yes, I think you should get releases from everyone in the film. That is unless you don't intend on buying E and O insurance to show it publicly.

As for the b-roll question, you don't need releases for crowd shots. However if one person is singled out on screen for any significant amount of time you need a release.

As for logo's in the background of the frame, so long as you didn't put them there, you are good. Incidentally shot logos are generally covered by fair use, which means you don't need clearance. However if you intentionally put a logo in frame, that is another story.


Tsvetina Kamenova
Fri 29 May 2009Link

FUNDING APPLICATIONS QUESTION

Hello all,

I am in the process of drafting various funding applications for a feature-length documentary currently in production and firstly I want to thank you for the amazing wealth of information you have all helped to create on the d-word. I have a few questions, however, that I have not been able to answer by looking at past posts.

1. Is it a good idea to reference other films in the proposal as a way to describe intended style, structure etc?

2. I know that some funders say they like pictures in the proposal, but is it ever not a good idea to put pictures? If you do have pictures, how do you usually use them?

3. Does anyone have experience with the Sundance Documentary Fund application? I am looking through their guidelines and they specify that they want a summary and then a synopsis. Do you know if by synopsis they are really looking for a treatment? (Is it ok to contact them and ask?)

I would really appreciate any input you might have.

Thanks a lot.


Doug Block
Fri 29 May 2009Link

Hi, Tsvetina.

1. Yes

2. Use photos if they're very strong and support and enhance what you're saying in the text. I'd wrap the text around them, but you can also put it at the top of your synopsis or treatment.

3. By all means you should call them. They're very nice and helpful and speaking to them will give you an opportunity to get your film on their radar (especially if you've found a good way to describe it in a sentence or two). Wait until you have a couple of questions, though.


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