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Welcome to The D-Word! Stop in and sign the guest book - let us know a little (or a lot) about yourself.

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Doug Block
Sun 12 May 2002Link
Welcome Paul and Dani.

Danielle Beverly
Tue 14 May 2002Link
Greetings Doc makers,

I'm Danielle Beverly, new to New York City via San Francisco and
Chicago. I've been working mainly for PBS since 1997. I'm in the last
months of production on my first feature documentary. The film follows
a 35 year old bipolar artist/chef/bulimic who destroyed her stomach and
esophagus in a failed suicide attempt, and is currently rebuilding her
life. I've done all the camera and sound on the film, as well as
produce it. Several doc makers suggested "d-word" as an excellent
resource, and I'm happy to now be part of this community.

Doug Block
Tue 14 May 2002Link
Well, you're part of this Forum, Danielle, but not part of this
community until you email me and Ben a request: d-word@d-word.com

Steve Cook
Mon 20 May 2002Link
Bonjour,
I am an Australian currently shooting a doco in France - my wife is
an editor and has worked on several Australian and French
documentaries, and was previously making a series out of Tokyo where
we previously lived.
I am photographer, getting my head around this black art, and an avid
(not the brand, the generic term) forum subscriber/contributor.
Our current project is following the creation of a new political
movement in France in the wake of the recent tumultuous presidential
elections, which yielded yet another notch in the extreme-right
wing's belt.
Looking forward to sharing ideas and experiences (although I am
reletively new to the moving picture side of things - I was
previously a Production manager for a media/internet development
company in Tokyo.)
Voila....
will email now.

Ben Kempas
Mon 20 May 2002Link
Welcome Steve. Hope to see you soon inside the Community as well.

Steven Leibo
Wed 5 Jun 2002Link
Hello: I am a professional historian who, having spent a great deal
of time as a "talking head" on the tube or on the radio doing
interviews about various contemporary international issues decided a
few years ago that I wanted to learn how to get behind the
camera/microphone and learn to make documentaries myself. I have thus
far produced a number of short mini-documentaries and am working on a
much larger piece. Since I am trying to learn as many aspects of
documentary film making as I can, from the creative to the very
technical, I am hoping this forum will be the right place to do that.

Doug Block
Wed 5 Jun 2002Link
Hey Steven, we can use more historians in The D-Word Community. Why
don't you email me and we'll get you in there: doug@d-word.com.

Kat Leung
Tue 11 Jun 2002Link
Hi all,
My name is Kathy and I currently reside in Beijing. My
experience so far in film has been writing and producing
fiction back home in Vancouver, Canada, but I've always been
fascinated with documentaries. Signed up to look for more
information about how to start making a documentary (where
to begin!), and to see if there's anyone in Beijing who
would like to start a project about the quickly disappearing
hutongs. Thanks and looking forward to being a part of this
forum.

Ben Kempas
Wed 12 Jun 2002Link
Welcome Kat! Of the people who have introduced themselves, I can't
remember anyone being from Beijing. But someone has to do the first
step ...
So what are Hutongs again?

Erin Nesbit
Wed 12 Jun 2002Link
Hi, my name's Erin.
I'm assisting on someone else's project in an effort to learn more
about the process of production. I actually did quite a bit of
documentary work as a student, but it was very low-tech and shoe-
string funding. So now I'm hoping to be introduced to the world of
people who do this professionally.

Ben Kempas
Wed 12 Jun 2002Link
Welcome to The D-Word, Erin!

Kat Leung
Wed 12 Jun 2002Link
Thanks for the warm welcome! Hutongs are old courtyard housing for
families (children, parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents
would live in the same compound but in different quarters with an
open courtyard in the middle) and they've been around for centuries.
With the 2008 Olympics coming, they're being leveled fast and the
ones that are being preserved are becoming very touristy. Are there
books or on-line resources you recommend to give an overview or an
idea on where to start (do I start with footage and see what I get
from that or do I begin with a story in mind...)? I probably have
very basic questions. Thanks!

Doug Block
Thu 13 Jun 2002Link
Welcome Kat and Erin! Kat, try www.aivf.org

Dani Dion
Fri 14 Jun 2002Link
Hi Kat, Welcome (from a fellow Vancouverite). Here is a link to a good, basic, free resource. It's not entirely documentary specific, but it's all relevant. http://www.cybercollege.com/tvp_ind.htm I'm on a similar mission myself. As for approaching funders, etc, I suppose it depends on whether you will be based in Beijing or Vancouver. Unless you can afford to go ahead and collect footage, I'd try to establish the money side first. Sounds like an interesting project. Good luck.


Phillip Anderson
Mon 17 Jun 2002Link
hi, all. i am a working filmmaker and the director of the 5th
annual channel islands indie film festival (sept 10-15 2002) in
ventura county, ca. we also curate a monthly series of
microcinema (shorts). we regularly screen docs addressing
progressive issues. we would love to see your film. cheers.

Dani Dion
Wed 19 Jun 2002Link
Welcome Phillip. I'm sure we'd all like more info on the festival,
if you have the time.

Scott Pierce
Thu 20 Jun 2002Link
Thanks for starting this resource, Doug. And hi, all!

I'm currently prepping for "Yanomami: The Last Stand", which
will be following one of the last of the Orinoco Cowboys back into
the Amazon. What raised my interest is, he's going to help curb
a global epidemic the old-fashioned way. Should be fun, if not a
complete trial by fire for me.

With my previous background in children's television and music
videos, this project has really restored my passion for the real
world again. It'll be great sharing time with like minds, who also
want to bring their visions of the world to audiences that may
never get a chance otherwise.

Ben Kempas
Thu 20 Jun 2002Link
Welcome to The D-Word, Scott!

Rick Miller
Fri 21 Jun 2002Link
Dragonfly Motion Pictures is a small (one-person) independent documentary production company located
in Toronto. Owned and operated by Rick Miller, I create low budget social issues documentaries. Dragonfly
also provides post production services to a variety of broadcast clients. Since graduating from York
University's film school in 1987I have acquired in excess of 100 editing credits on documentaries for
Canadian broadcasters TVO, CTV, CBC, History, Discovery, Bravo, and Vision.

Dragonfly Motion Pictures has three documentaries in production. "David, his bubby, and Goliath" profiles
a family of radical activist who follow the ancient Jewish tradition of Tikkun Olam: healing the world
through social action. "The Cost of Copper" documents the history of remote northern Quebec mining
village which is in the process of becoming a ghost town. "Beer: A Love Story" is an examination of
Canada"s love affair with beer.

I hope that The D Word will provide me with a forum to acquire advice on issues that arise from time to
time when I produce my documentaries. I often have questions about ethics and story development that
I've not been able to find answers to anywhere else on the web. I'll also have questions about the craft of
documentary making. I also hope that I'll be able to make a positive contribution to your forums by
sharing my experiences with fellow filmmakers.

millrick,
Toronto
June 21, 2002

Victoria Mielke
Fri 21 Jun 2002Link
Hello,

I have been interested in documentaries since childhood. I
enjoyed "The Atomic Cafe" thoroughly as an example of popular culture
historic preservation.

I am a native of the Detroit, MI, USA area. I am a writer by training
and have a college degree in journalism. What I need is education in
filmmaking. I am interested in meeting another person with a film
background who would like to collaborate with a writer.

I have an idea for a documentary that was spawned by recent historic
events, that I believe could be done with taste and care if it is
planned first.

As a fan of popular culture, I am interested in how the events of 11
September 2001 had an impact on the "high" and "low" arts of the USA
and overseas. In other words, I would like to work on a documentary
about the popular culture of 9/11 that examines both professionally
produced items and "folk art" from ordinary citizens.

1. For example, the commemorative items, from high quality books and
memorial items, to the "kitsch" that remembers this dark date in US
history.

2. I am also interested in how 9/11 had an impact -- though brief --
on popular entertainment. From erasing the Twin Towers from movies,
to star-studded benefit concerts, reactions in corporate America
varied.

3. Another aspect of 9/11 pop culture involves the Web, such as the
folklore ("Tourist Guy"; Nostradamus) and endless memorial sites and
graphics.

4. Symbolism, iconography and jargon of 9/11. What person who lived
through this era does not know the meaning of "Ground Zero," "Let's
roll," towers with US flag behind them, or what a looped, red, white
and blue ribbon means? Major events often gain their own language and
symbolism, that when presented years later, will still evoke memories
of those who lived through or studied them.

The body of materials produced in reaction to 9/11 is a snapshot in
time, a reflection of recent American history. Even the tackiest
item -- a sequined purse sold in Australia showing a jet hitting a
tower -- tells us of emotions, opinions and reactions of the era.

Dani Dion
Fri 21 Jun 2002Link
Welcome Victoria, Rick & Scott. Good luck with all your projects.
What global epidemic is Yanomami fighting? I thirstily await "Beer: A
Love Story" while clutching my sequined, tragedy satchel...

Victoria Mielke
Fri 21 Jun 2002Link
Question:

How do I go about looking for a filmmaking partner to pursue this
documentary idea? I can write, such as scripting, but I need a person
with the technical know-how; i.e. camera operation, selection of film
or digital video, etc.

Robert Goodman
Sat 22 Jun 2002Link
Start by contacting the film office in Detroit or Michigan. Ask about
all the professional organizations - network - find out who's doing
what. There are plenty of talented people out there - you just need to
find them. Another avenue is to look at the credits on shows that you
like and contact those people. Locally produced docs would be a place
to start.

Some advice - the most powerful docs are those with a central
character who undergoes change. We want to see people not ideas.
Figure out how to tell story with a person at the center.

Bill Wroblewski
Tue 25 Jun 2002Link
Greetings, all!

My name is Bill, and I am a journalism student at the University of
Minnesota - Twin Cities. Most of my work has been in print, but I am
becoming more and more interested in documentary film. I have a
little experience in the classroom, but am always looking for outside
opportunities. I have talked with a number of professionals here in
the TCs, and was referred to this site. So, here I am, looking
forward to hanging out, catching the buzz, and asking questions...

Cheers!

Doug Block
Wed 26 Jun 2002Link
I've been away for a few weeks and nice to see so many new folks
here! Welcome Phillip, Scott, Rick, Victoria, Bill. Keep asking
those questions (although the Mentoring topic is the best place to ask
them, at least after your initial introductory post).

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