The Mentoring Room - Ask the Working Pros

Mentoring Room

  • Public

This is a Public Topic geared towards first-time filmmakers. Professional members of The D-Word will come by and answer your questions about documentary filmmaking.

Naftali Beane Rutter
Fan

Hello everybody---

My new feature doc, an all- verite day in the life of three families in New Orleans, was accepted free of charge to the Thessaloniki Documentary Film Market after I submitted to the Film Festival. The movie is not in the festival, and it has not yet been picked up by any distributor (although I got really really close, dammit!)

I have never been to a film market of any sort before, and can find very little info on the net about the Thessaloniki Docmarket. So I am wondering if anyone has had any experience there or has heard anything, can tell me a bit about other docmarkets, whether it would be useful to be there in person or whether it's too crazy to go all the way to Greece [from Brooklyn]. One other thing to consider-– My flick is definitely a European style movie, which could hypothetically be most successful with audiences over there, so this market could be exactly where I want it to be in terms of target audience.

Thank you thank you thank you,

naftali

Doug Block
Host

Naftali, it's not really worth it to go over to Greece if you're just in the market. Often they don't even let the filmmaker in to where the market is, it's just a bunch of commissioning editors and festival programmers sitting in a room with monitors watching stacks of films on dvd. What you really want to do is get your film to the few good sales agents out there that take on docs and sell them internationally (Films Transit and Roco Films are two). They go to the various markets and larger festivals and do the dirty work for you. Meanwhile, keep applying to film festivals and try to premiere it in the biggest and best one possible before you settle for the second or third tier festivals. Lots of luck.

Chahid Charbel Akoury
Pro

In reply to James Longley's post on Tue 13 Jan 2009 :

thank you for the reply Mr. Longley.... i just had a chance to try the Sony PMW-EX3 as a friend is over to visit from the U.S. and i found it to be rather good, except for some minor details, i'll try and find a Panasonic HPX170 , unfortunately we do not have a vast range of camcorders, or anything but the commercially available consumer minicams in lebanon... well its more convenient for me to shoot directly onto solid state cards.
and as you say it's pretty much "drag-and-drop" to get the material off the cards and into hard drives for editing.... i found it so easy especially with the non-linearity approach to viewing the clips ...

thank you again...

Naftali Beane Rutter
Fan

In reply to Doug Block's post on Tue 13 Jan 2009 :

Doug,

Thank you very much. Mmmm, dirty work for me. That sounds fantastic. I will track Films Transit and Roco as best as I can.
And I am applying to those festivals, oh yes, I am applying those festivals. Thanks for the luck.

And good luck with all you are doing.

Best of the best,
naftali

Matt Dubuque
Pro

In reply to James Longley's post on Tue 13 Jan 2009 :

Your welcome James. I enjoyed it.

I wanted to ask you, on some of your long shots it occasionally seems that you are shooting the footage with music in your head. It seems that the way some of your camera movements are made as you wind your way down passageways in Baghdad, Gaza or Najaf have a distinct rhythm and syncopation to them, separate and apart from the way you punctuate your edits.

I play percussion and I occasionally had this distinct impression while watching your work. Is this true? Do you ever have music or rhythm in mind as you shoot any of your "Steadicam" shots?

Thanks,

Matt Dubuque

James Longley
Pro

Everything is hand-held in those films and the only music is the music of the spheres.

Matt Dubuque
Pro

Cool. Filming to Pythagoras. I can relate!

Cheers,

Matt

Matt Dubuque
Pro

Can I write off my camera, lights and sound equipment?

Hello-

I'm asking this question here because others may have it and I trust the answers from a tax law library or tax professionals that may be here far more than a Google search.

However, I find the CCH and RIA tax materials somewhat disorganized in their approach and layout, so I'm trying to avoid a trip to the law library.

Here goes:

I'm conviced I can make a profit on some of my films over the next five years and am willing to prove this to the IRS over time. This is the first year of my business and it is not a hobby.

As such, I am filling out a Schedule C and possibly a Form 4562 for tax treatment of my purchases of camera, lights and sound equipment.

I would like to expense these items rather than depreciating them. Can I do so?

Thanks. I just wish the Rutter Group (or even CEB) would make tax guides.

Matt Dubuque

James Longley
Pro

Yes – I think you can do this – but most tax advisors will probably tell you that you should calculate whether that will be the most beneficial thing to do.

Matt Dubuque
Pro

Super, thanks so much James. I managed to get hold of the IRS instructions for this form (Form 4562) and was finally able to confirm that this is possible; the wording is pretty dense, but after reading it many times to learn whether film gear is considered a "listed" asset or not, I was finally able to decipher it.

I have a string of documentaries in the queue and have set up both non-profit and profit entities for them. I feel comfortable that for this particular for-profit entity this is what I want to do....

Many thanks,

Hope all is well.

Marcia Pacheco
Fan

I'm sure you guys have already gone through this, but, I'm in need... Sorry!!! I'm currently working on my release forms for my documentary. The catch is it's a thesis project in order to gain my Masters degree. May you help me with sample release forms?

Thanks in advance.

Ethan Steinman
Pro

Marcia, do a search for "release form" on this forum you'll find several examples. If you need one in Spanish, let me know and I can dig one up.

Wendell Martinez
Fan

Hello to everyone in D-Word community,
I am a 35 year old living Brooklyn, NY who over the past 5-7 years has fallen in love with the documentary medium and is looking to make a career transition into this field. My original background has been in the fine arts industry of New York, but I now find it unfulfilling and less socially vital than important cultural visual media. I recently have been laid off due to the economy which I very much want to use as an opportunity to get involved in this industry. As you may know It's usually a bit difficult to get that first bit of experience in a new field when one has no previous experience in it. I'm setting my sights on getting a internship with any individual filmmakers or production companies to meet people and gain experience. I have been viewing craigslist regularly and applying there and it occurred to me that I could possibly post an "internship wanted" ad in the classified section of D-Word. I wanted to request any thoughts or input from anyone of the D-Words members regarding the likelyhood of attaining an internship at my age, or any thoughts or tips on going about getting involved with this amazing medium that has changed the way I see the world.

Thanks to all for your time and consideration,
Dell Martinez

Christopher Wong
Pro

welcome, Wendell. in your time off from work, you should see if you can learn the basics of editing in Final Cut Pro. the most useful interns often work as assistant editors – digitizing, organizing, and finding footage. this will give you a great introduction to what documentary filmmaking is all about (assuming the director you are working for is competent...) best of luck as you make your transition!

Amir Bar-Lev
Pro

Hello everyone;
I may be hired to creatively consult / oversee a documentary by a financier. I've never held this role and wondered if anyone out there had experience with this. I'm putting together a proposal right now and would be grateful for suggestions, the more detailed the better. Should I suggest being compensated by the week or a percentage of the budget? Should I ask for back end profit participation? As you can probably tell, since this isn't my own film, I'd like to make it work for me in a "work for hire" fashion, that is, I'd like to get paid as well as possible. What credit should I ask for? What "looks better on a resume," to put it crassly? Producer? Co-director? I'd also like to make sure I respect the director's vision and be helpful without stepping on toes. Has anyone been in this type of relationship before and what are some pitfalls I should look out for? Thanks in advance for your time –
Amir

Evan Thomas
Fan

Hi all,

I will soon be recording a choir for soundtrack use – so sound only. What releases should i get from the choir members? Can i get all of them to sign one form? If the piece of music is out of copyright then i just have to get permission to use their performance right? This is small choir at a local cathedral singing sacred music for mass.

cheers,
Evan

Diane Johnson
Fan

Hi does anyone know how much typically an expert is paid to in order for them to agree to be interviewed for your documentary? What is the typical payment for someone who is an expert on their field (but who is not famous *famous meaning written a book or something like this)

Christopher Wong
Pro

typically, you don't have to pay experts a dime... if they are really interested in their field, and in getting their views out there, many of them are actually appreciative of the opportunity to do so on film.

of course, you don't want to waste their time either. your only "payment" to them needs to be an organized production, perhaps a meal or two depending on the length of the shoot, asking good questions, and of course, finishing your film. at the end, they should also receive a complimentary DVD and perhaps an invitation to a local film festival where your work is playing.

don't offer any cash if you can at all help it. if they ask for it, just plead poverty and inform them about the "low-budget" nature of documentary. if they insist on payment, you can just find another expert, or find some other non-monetary compensation that will satisfy them.

Jennifer Davis-Lewis
Pro

Not sure if this is the right place to post but I need to put closed captioning on the doc before a company will pick it up for distribution. Where do i find out how to do this?

Jennifer Samuel
Pro

New to D-word and will introduce myself properly soon. For now, I'm in desperate need of a filming studio in Brooklyn, NY for this weekend. Doesn't need to be a big space but quiet with some backgrounds etc. for sure and under $1000. Any suggestions?

Andre Dahlman
Pro

Hello Everybody,

Looking for some recommendations of high quality documentary websites.
I am putting together a website for a documentary and I'm looking for ideas. Anyone got a favorite site they want to plug?

Many thanks.

Rachel Leah Jones
Pro

i'm not sure this is the right place to post, so please redirect me if the post is errant:

i'm using FCP 5.0 on a MacBook Pro. i just recently upgraded to OS 10.5 and FCP (which is the same version as before) is acting a little weird. when i digitize, it gives me this new window called "Analyzing DV Audio" and inside it reads "Validating Audio Data." it takes anywhere from 1-10 minutes depending on the clip. it appears once capture is complete. if i press cancel, the clip evaporates as if i never captured it. if i let it do its thing, when i play a clip captured with in and out points ("batch capture") i lose sync (sound trails about a second behind image). but when i capture on the fly ("capture now") the clips are in sync.

HELP!

Wil Rumps
Fan

Any advive on how to promote my first doc.? I do not have a big budget (read "any") and am trying to get the most buzz for my time spent. Thanks

Wil Rumps
Fan

Well, thanks, I guess? I have been there. I am looking for more inside info that other people have found to work for them.

Christopher Wong
Pro

two things that might help you:

1) whether or not you are finished with your first doc, a good trailer helps to get people's interest going. best advice on this forum has been to keep your trailer to no more than 2 minutes long. if you don't quite have the skills to form a tight trailer, then it also helps to put together a DVD of 2-3 of your best scenes. these scenes should fall into the 1-2 minute range.

2) once you have your trailer/clips ready, start marketing them to your target audience. if you are profiling gamers, then start posting about your project at the various online gaming communities. once those communities get excited about what you are doing, they'll spread the word amongst themselves. think about secondary audiences as well. maybe it's not just gamers who want to see your doc; it's possible that a lot of parents would really connect to the characters in your film – parents who are concerned about their own children getting "addicted" to the world of gaming.

just a few suggestions to get you going.

Wil Rumps
Fan

Thanks for those tips. I have been doing that for a while. I never thought of the parent angel, though. I will have to work on that one next. If any one else has an insight please let me know. Here is one of our current trailers http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avunegDHcD8 Just to show you what we are working with.

Timothy S. McCarty
Pro

In reply to Diane Johnson's post on Sun 25 Jan 2009 :

I Agree with Christopher! Don't pay for something you can get for free. We find that telling most experts who participate in our doc efforts that a full credit (Name, Title, Business/School etc...) will appear as both a lower third graphic and in our doc's end credits burned onto the DVD goes a long way with most who have the right intentions, too!

Good luck!

Matthew Dougherty
Fan

Working on my first budget – are grants and foundations more likely to give money to rent camera and sound equipment – or is it acceptable to list the retail price of a camera (around $5k)... and would i get to keep it?

basically, are grants generally against or ok with helping filmmakers buy reasonably priced equipment?

Lynn Smith
Fan

I just applied for my first grant as a first time filmmaker just to meet the deadline. I hadn't found any production people to work with me at the time and still need to know how to find a good camera, or a good video person who knows sound. I'm signed up for a digital video class and a Final Pro Class at UC Irvine, but it's not until June.
All advice very much appreciated!!

Erica Ginsberg
Host

Matthew, many grant-makers do not support the purchase of equipment since they are supporting a single project rather than a production entity which would be likely to make use of the equipment beyond that single project. However, many funders understand that independent filmmakers with their own equipment may include the rental cost of equipment in their budget (essentially renting from themselves) and that this generally ends up being more cost-effective than renting the equipment from a third party rental house.

Lynn, had you thought of asking the instructor of the digital video class you'll be taking at UC Irvine? He/She may be interested or have some leads on professionals in your area. You may also want to do a search on the People page here in D-Word and see who is in the area (or maybe extend the search to include LA) and contact a few folks who look like they have the skills you want. They may not be able to do it for free, but might be convinced to work for a fair price if they are taken by the topic of your film.

Ramona Diaz
Pro

Matthew – You should just buy the equipment, rent it to the project and amortize it that way. Some funders – ITVS for example – will allow you to buy equipment or expendables (and nowadays that includes hard drives) up to $1,000. You have to get approval for equipment expense over $1k. And that usually comes with the caveat – if they approve it – that the equipment belongs to them. If i were you, I'd just buy it and rent back.

Lynn Smith
Fan

Erica--thank you! I'll check out the People page right now....

Matthew Dougherty
Fan

Thank you Erica and Ramona for the advice, I'll put it to use! Appreciate it!

Sudeshna Chowdhury
Fan

Hello everybody. I am into journalism.
Well I have just started out in the field of film making.Can you please tell me how do i go about it.In India there are few media houses which make documentaries. Are there specific opportunities anywhere or independent film making is the only way out.
Regards

Doug Block
Host

Welcome, Sudeshna. There aren't many media companies that make documentaries anywhere, even the U.S. So, especially given how inexpensive hi-def camcorders are, not to mention editing software like Final Cut Pro, a lot of people start out just by leaping in and making a film. A short documentary may be the way to go, you'll learn a lot and hopefully not lose too much money. Then you can take it from there. Best of luck, whichever path you ultimately choose.

Susanne Larsen
Pro

Hi all,
Does anyone know of classes on doc research in the US? There is a Researcher's Masterclass in London at DFG docs, but I'd love to find something closer to home.
Thanks.
Susanne

Stefan Immler
Pro

In reply to Diane Johnson's post on Sun 25 Jan 2009 :

I agree with Christopher to an expert usually doesn't get a honorarium, unless they insist. If they do and you are on a tight budget, you could specify a certain amount in the interview release form that will be given to him/her after the film has found a commercial release.

Mark Barroso
Pro

In reply to Sudeshna Chowdhury's post on Fri 20 Feb 2009 :

My advice is to think small. Write stories or produce 3-5 minute videos on topics that interest you for a website (could be an on-line newspaper). The experience will teach you 1) if it's something you really like doing 2) how to work efficiently and 3) get the attention of people who might want to hire you.

These days there are no shortage of people who will post your material.

Wang Fu
Pro

Hi to all of you this is my first time to join D world.

I need some of your guidance about editing with Adobe Preme.
I am very new to make documentary and this is my first time.

i have already shoot video with different, different video camera using mini video tape. almost i have got 40 hours of video.
now i want to edit with using adobe preme. Can some one say, which format i should start editing and save file also. I am new to preme also.
Thanks

Robert Goodman
Pro

It's hard to tell from your description if you shot on different video formats or if you used different cameras that all recorded on miniDV tape. If you shot everything on miniDV tape, you can use that format to edit everything in Premiere. Simply select the PAL or NTSC option in Premiere.

Ben – before you speak for all, please ask. I have used Premiere, Edius, Avid, FCP, Speed Razor, Edit and too many other programs to edit docs.

Wang Fu
Pro

Thanks Robert Goodman for your answer.

Really i do not know that in which format they shoot video because that time and even now i am very new to camera and shoot by so many different people and now i want to edit it. But i know all are in Mini Dv tape. But we shoot with good camera and now i have only tapes, i do not have those camera anymore with me. I have one question that when i edit and capture video then need to get first another camera to play tape and then can capture. I have my simple camera SONY DCR-HC26 so if i put that tape in SONY DCR-HC26 and then play and capture video then do you think that i will loose the quality of video because before camera was good and now this camera SONY DCR-HC26 is very simple. Please do not mind i am very new for this so asking this type of question.
Thanks

John Burgan
Host

There is absolutely no difference in quality when you are just using the camera as a player.

Do check out the dedicated Adobe Premiere forum recommended above.

Christopher Wong
Pro

wang fu,
if all of your tapes on on MiniDV, then you can use any MiniDV camera to capture the video. you will not lose any quality in the capture. the only thing you might need to pay attention to is whether those tapes were shot in NTSC or PAL, and also what framerates the footage was acquired at (29.97, 24p, etc.). good luck.

Wang Fu
Pro

Thanks for your answer John Burgan and now i am not worry ,
really i was little worry before that if i use simple camera SONY DCR-HC26 to transfer then i may loose the video quality.
I will check out the Adobe Premiere forum nicely.
Thanks

Wang Fu
Pro

Thanks Christopher Wong.
I am not sure video was shoot in NTSC or PAL but i am sure it was in 24p.
But i want to edit with NTSC format.

Wang Fu
Pro

I am sorry Christopher Wong i type wrong . Actually video was not shoot in 24p

Riley Morton
Pro

to Wang Fu,
when you are successful getting your footage in the system, you should be able determine (in info about the clips) whether it was PAL (25 fps) or NTSC (30 fps).
If you want to edit (and deliver the final piece) in NTSC, then you will need to transfer any PAL footage into NTSC, something that any dubbing house can do there in your city.
Altnernatively, you can make that transfer using software like Nattress Standards Conversion:
http://www.nattress.com/Products/standardsconversion/standardsconversion.htm
to make all your PAL footage into NTSC.

if your Sony Camera can playback the footage, you should be able to use that camera to capture the footage into your system with NO loss in quality.

Dustan Lewis McBain
Fan

hey guys, so im getting starting on a documentary and I'ts on social workers and therapy. Any ideas on this? or any films i can get ideas from?

Mark Barroso
Pro

Dustan:
The more details you offer the better the feedback we can give. This one is pretty broad. I will tell you, however, to not rely on the camera mic built into your camera and instead buy or rent wireless lavs and a good boom or shotgun mic.

Dustan Lewis McBain
Fan

yeah true say, kk so heres the pitch. Imagine elementary schools with children that behave badly. Now when these principles at these schools feel that there is nothing left to do, there is this company called bartimaeus to help. This company is a group of social workers that take up a class time and work with kids and teach them moral values and how to communicate with people. (basically this program teaches them how to be leaders, motivation, being independent... you get the idea) Now this company has hired me to shoot a 4-5 min doc describing what they do so that they can hand it out to schools.

I am trying to figure out what exact style this doc deserves to be. Any ideas?

James Longley
Pro

I think it should be a combination of live action and animation with a Pink Floyd soundtrack.

Evan Thomas
Fan

Yo.

I wish to import some video into my final cut project. Should i download the material as HiRes MPEG4 or MPEG2? Does FCP import both of these file types? I'd assume the hi res MPEG4 but the MPEG2 is much bigger in size. Confused. I could keep googling it but eventually decided to google d-word so here i am.

Mark Barroso
Pro

In reply to dustan lewis mcbain's post on Fri 27 Feb 2009 :

Without knowing more about your level of experience, the easiest thing would be to do something something to a news report, similar to what you would see on your local tv. Watch some of those segments and you will see the elements you need to get, and the order in which to edit them together.

Yours would be about twice the length, but it would be a great place to start.

Wang Fu
Pro

please suggest me ..
i want to record voice separately as narration which i will use for my documentary. which is the good instruments to use to record voice without using camera, means i want just record voice not the video.
Thanks

Jo-Anne Velin
Pro

What kind of audio recording equipment do you have now? Is it digital? Do you use minidisc? Or anything else like that? What kind of microphone do you have?

Mark Barroso
Pro

You can record directly to your computer with the right equipment.

Wang Fu
Pro

In reply to Jo-Anne Velin's post on Fri 27 Feb 2009 :
I do not have any audio recording equipement. but i want to buy whole things which can record voice in good quaility. i do not have any microphone i will buy so i need to know which is good, which equipement is good, i want only for audi recording which i will use in docoumentary.
Thanks

Mario Berlinguer
Fan

In reply to Wang Fu's post on Sat 28 Feb 2009 :
Wang, I don't want to sound antiquate, but you may want to consider a DAT, and a good microphone. There are some excellent portable DAT recorders on the used market, they are lightweight so that you can bring it along in future projects (excellent for interviews or field work etc.), the quality is very high and then you can feed it to your computer both via analog or digital inputs, and edit with any audio software if there's some background noise to clean etc. I have a small Tascam that works great.
As for the microphone I can't help you much, since I'd guess it's different to record a spoken voice than singing voice or instruments. For singing solo voice I use a rather bulky microphone, for vocal ensembles two more compact Shure, they have a good range from which you can choose. Whatever you choose, I'd suggest you to buy two of the same, so you can also use them for live/field recordings in stereo.
Hope this helps.

Andy Schocken
Pro

Wang Fu, rather than asking a series of basic questions about production, it may be more helpful for you to take advantage of some online training resources to learn some fundamentals of film/tv production. I'm sure there are a number of sites offering this type of thing, but you'll find the following link to online training from the BBC helpful to start. Once you've done some research, you'll be able to come back here to have more specific questions addressed.

http://www.bbctraining.com/television.asp

Dustan Lewis McBain
Fan

In reply to Mark Barroso's post on Fri 27 Feb 2009 :
so in terms of recording audio, if i were to put a wireless mic on the person i am documenting, wouldn't the audio come out all muffled because of movement? that being said, what is the best way to get audio? Im thinking regular boom

Mark Barroso
Pro

Would seeing the mic bother you? In news, it's accepted. In doc filmmaking, it's not. You can pick. Tiny mics like the Countryman B6 can poke through a button hole and never be seen. There are too many techniques on hiding mics to list here, but it can be done. Plus, if you buy a mic like the B6 you can get a capsule that boosts the high frequencies to compensate for the muffling.
If you have an assistant that can hold a good boom mic, it would probably be fine. Just don't try to shoot and hold the boom, too.

Jack Trau
Fan

Hi my name is Jack and I was wondering about licensing to television and what some rates might be for documentaries which run around 50 in length. a link to any information would be very helpful.

Blue Sky's

Dustan Lewis McBain
Fan

In reply to Mark Barroso's post on Sun 1 Mar 2009 :

haha ill try to get an assistant, thats good advice and a good point on hiding the mic, mabey ill get him to even wear a black shirt to hide it? what ever ill do im gonna take a day to test shoot and try both out and see what sounds best. In terms of composition of shots, now everything is live when im shooting this so i wont have the time to align the most compositional shots, so what do you think is the best way to get coverage. Im thinking to play it safe. Like getting everything in the story is more important so ill keep it mostly wide shots, but my B-role will be close and thought out, i think that makes sense?

Mark Barroso
Pro

Sure, makes sense. Just remember that you're in charge of the set. They can get some learnin' another day. Today, we make video. Do what you're told or else I show the whole world you're a screw-up.

This works for me all the time.

Tina Flemmerer
Pro

Hello everyone,

I am really excited about this portal and all the helpful information you people share. Now I am hoping that someone can help me with my question.

This summer I am planning on going to Germany and then Poland to work on a piece about my mother who is searching for her birth house in Poland. I am planning on brining my own equipment, (camera, mic, tripod & laptop) into Europe, but I am not sure if I have to declare my camera with German customs.

From what I have heard German customs is really cracking down on people coming from America who bought electronics there so I don't want to get into trouble. I'd appreciate any advice. Thank you.

Tina Flemmerer
Pro

In reply to dustan lewis mcbain's post on Mon 2 Mar 2009 :

Dustan,

I would not advise you to stay wide for most of the shots. You will regret it later in editing.

The people who hired you are looking to promote themselves to schools with this video. Your customer wants the schools to be engaged in their presentation, they need to draw them in to get hired, so that should be your motivation too. The closer you are to your subject the more your audience will identify with them and like them. So I would go with an array of medium to close shots if I was you.

This is about working with children, right? So get lot's of close ups of the children, their eyes, a smile, a raised hand, and of course lot's of interaction between the social worker and the children. Once children are engaged in some sort of activity they are so natural on camera, and that will make you look good.

If you are nervous about your shooting skills you should go out and practice. I like to practice at the Union Square Farmers Market here in New York. You have a lot of people that are busy shopping and most likely they won't mind to be videotaped. Also, they are not going to stay at a fruit stand until you have found your perfect shot, so it's a perfect way to train yourself to make rapid decisions and get a full array of shots withing a limited time.

And definitely use Mark's advice; you have the camera, so you are the boss!!!

It sounds like an exciting project, I wish you good luck with it.

John Burgan
Host

Tina – there are no restrictions on bringing camera, mic, tripod & laptop for your personal use, so it's mainly a question whether this is clearly pro equipment or more prosumer. If it's new gear, it might help to have some proof of ownership with you.

Tina Flemmerer
Pro

In reply to John Burgan's post on Wed 4 Mar 2009 :

John,

thank you for your advice. Well, it is a Panasonic HVX200 camera, so I would say it's more on the pro than on the prosumer end, right? And you are sure that I don't have to declare it even if I should decide to stay in Germany? Do I have to tell the customs people about it though?

Wang Fu
Pro

To Give a name of my documentary do I need to register name and get copyright or something like this ? Or just I can name documentary as I want?

Christopher Wong
Pro

name the documentary whatever you want... but i would not worry about that right now. you can decide on the title when you are done (or nearly done) with the film – right now, just concentrate on making it good.

John Burgan
Host

In reply to tina flemmerer's post on Wed 4 Mar 2009 :

Hmm, well you're right, the HVX200 is more on the pro end. Have you looked into getting a journalist visa? That's what we do when we work officially in the US. Then at least you'd have no worries.

Ben Kempas
Pro

Visas are about people and passport controls. This is about equipment and customs. If you travel with professional equipment, you'll need an A.T.A. Carnet issued by your chamber of commerce. Pretty much a standard procedure.

Start here: http://www.uscib.org/index.asp?DocumentID=1843

Tina Flemmerer
Pro

John, Ben,
thank you for your responses, they were very helpful.

But I think I might end up staying in Germany for a while which makes things easier. I just read that you don't have to pay taxes for your personal and professional household goods if you intend to move to Germany. So we'll see. Thanks again.

Wang Fu
Pro

Before 3 years I shoot some important video from camera SONY DCR-HC26 . Now I want to use this 5 minutes video which I shoot from this simple camera.
All other video which I shoot is in good quality from good camera and I am using for my documentary.
Can I mix this five minutes video which I shoot from SONY DCR-HC26? Is this will affect bad in whole documentary? Actually what footage from (SONY DCR-HC26 ) I want to use it can not shoot again…
Thanks if anyone advice I should use or not.

John Burgan
Host

It depends very much on the film you are making. Some combine material from a wide variety of sources – archive, home movies, news, high-medium-low quality – whereas with others the visual continuity is of prime importance.

The question is – what do you want to achieve with your project?

Christopher Wong
Pro

In reply to Wang Fu's post on Thu 5 Mar 2009 :

the simple answer is YES. you can always combine footage from many different sources. the result may or may not be visually pleasing, but if you can't reshoot something, you have to just use what you have.

Esther Pimentel
Fan

My name is Maria Esther Pimentel. I´m a high school student in Los Angeles, interested in documentary projects. Can you please help me with the following questions?

1. What is the average range Budget in Documentary Films? The estimated dollar budget amount for my first-possible/future documentary is $450,084. For a documentary, the mentioned budget amount would be law, normal, or high? Keeping in mind that it will be film in Latin America.

2. Can you guide me to a link/site where I can see a sample of a professional business proposal for a documentary package, before presenting it to a possible investor?

3. Can you guide me to a link/site where I can see a copy of a professional sample budget?

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Esther Pimentel

Erica Ginsberg
Host

Esther, it's great that you are thinking about such things as a professional proposal and budget this early in your career. While the budget you mention is not unheard of, especially for a project involving travel, it might be a bit high if this is going to be your first feature film. It would be hard to offer more specific advice without knowing more about the project (i.e., one country or several, how long the finished film will be, what you plan to shoot on, will you have to hire interpreters and do subtitles after shooting, etc.). My recommendation would be to join a free documentary filmmakers' listserv called Doculink which is headquarted right there in L.A. Its co-founder Robert Bahar also authored a very useful article on budgeting and an Excel Template Budget which you may find useful.

Although I am sure you've already thought of this (and maybe have already done it), if you haven't made a documentary before, you may want to try doing something short and local first to test the waters. You may also want to see if there are some youth media programs in LA or any kind of training at a public access TV station or community college which would be open to high school students.

Nicholas Wiesnet
Fan

Hi all! My name is Nicholas Wiesnet and I'm an undergraduate cinematographer at Chapman University in Southern California from Seattle, WA. I'm looking for a fixer in Cameroon – Anyone have any contacts? A friend recommended I check out this site when she heard that I was shooting a doc there. Any suggestions or contacts would be MUCH appreciated!

Cheers, Nicholas

William Gazecki
Pro

In reply to tina flemmerer's post on Wed 4 Mar 2009 : I've heard the ATA Carnets can be expensive, and an easier route is to have a U.S. Customs Declaration of all your gear as you leave the U.S. Apparently for personal gear it's just as good as a Carnet in establishing proof of ownership and origin of goods.

Ben Kempas
Pro

That's good enough for an easy return to the U.S., but it doesn't guarantee you hassle-free entry into the country you're visiting.

Casey Crowdis
Fan

Greetings,
I am working on a documentary in Canada, though I am US based. Are there any considerations for working with a fiscal sponsor in another country? Most of the donors for the film will likely be Canadian.

Related to that issue, if I don't use a fiscal sponsor, is there any benefit to a person donating to my film? Thanks! –c

Marj Safinia
Host

A US fiscal sponsor will only be able to offer the tax incentive to US taxpayers, so you'd have to seek out a similar thing in Canada if you want to appeal primarily to Canadian taxpayers. However, if you're seeking US foundation $$, you won't be able to get them (usually) unless you have a US fiscal sponsor. Sounds like you might want to have both?

Generally speaking, a donor will give money to your film because they care about the subject matter, because they care about you or because they care about documentary. Ideally all three. It's very rare that someone will give you money just for the tax incentive. That's a sweetener, for sure, but the real reason anyone will give you money is because you're passionate, dedicated and trying to tell a story for important reasons.

Casey Crowdis
Fan

Very helpful answer, Marj! I'm considering partnering with a local museum in Canada since it is relevant to the documentary and is a beloved attraction in the town. I will keep my antenna up in case there is interest on the US side to consider getting a sponsor here. Thanks for the advice. –c

Michael Fagans
Fan

Wondering if there are good or recommended choices for choosing mini-DV tape brands and quality for shooting an HDV doc? Thanks.

Loading...