The Mentoring Room - Ask the Working Pros

Mentoring Room

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This is a Public Topic geared towards first-time filmmakers. Professional members of The D-Word will come by and answer your questions about documentary filmmaking.

Deleted User
Fan
Whenever I've had subjects sign releases, I always ask them
immediately after (not before) the interview or appearance
is completed, so that it doesn't make them freezeup or run
away. In my previous post re: my friend (amateur videographer,
traveler) he felt it would spoil the moment and will probably
opt to just get their name and contact info in a friendly
interchange after the on camera stuff. That way if we
eventually produce anything that might be distributed for
profit or aired etc. he'll try to contact them and get a release
signed at that time. In the worst case scenario where we couldn't
reach someone for a needed signature and we really want to use
the footage, I guess we could wait til they see or hear about the
release and pursue us asking for pay or whatever. He's not shooting
any reluctant people or embarassing type of subject matter.
Doug Block
Host
simone, i agree with chris2. have them sign after the interview.
explain that it's not your druthers but the broadcasters require 'em.
be low key and professional about it.

chris2, i tend to draw the line with people who speak on camera. or
if they appear prominently in footage that might cause embarrassment
later. otherwise, i don't worry too much about it. but that's just
me ;-)
Erica Ginsberg
Host
With the "willing experts," have them sign the release before the
interview. Usually, I send it to them a few days ahead of time and
explain why we need it and to feel free to call me if they have any
questions or concerns. I ask them to bring it to the interview.
I've never had anyone question it (but I did have a "willing expert"
become "unwilling" when presented with the release AFTER the
interview; it was a big blow to both of us for feeling we had wasted
the time of the interview).

With "man on the street," I judge the circumstances of the
interview. In general, I also try to get the release signed before
the interview, but have done it after as well. I usually find that
using a dose of humor helps - "Now's when I need to ask you to sign
your life away," followed by a brief explanation of why I need the
release (similar to what Doug said) usually does the trick.
Mfilmie28
Fan
This is more of a producing question--but i'm looking everywhere for
help...I'm producing/directing/writing/editing, etc. a doc. about an
independent avant-garde record label. They want the copyrights and
so do I...what do you think is fair? can we share?
thanks if you can help,
sincerely,
meryl
Doug Block
Host
meryl, the simplest and lowest budget solution is for them to
maintain copyright and you simply license the music for the film
itself (worldwide rights, all media, in perpetuity). if you make a
big concession over the copyright you can probably get the price down
pretty low. then y'all can work as partners in crime in getting the
film out as widely as possible.

why would you need to own the copyright, btw?
Mfilmie28
Fan
thanks for the response Doug. I am obtaining all licensing rights
for the musicindeed...what price are you talking about though?
to answer your question, I want the copyright because I funded it,
made it all myself, etc....so i feel as though I should own it. >?
is that stupid of me? as long as it is in the contract that they
will sell it in perpetuity, and if not, then i have the rights to
sell it..i guess it doesn't really matter. ?
they are licensing the music to me for free.
Doug Block
Host
oh, i misunderstood, meryl. i thought the issue was copyright to
their music. if it's copyright to the film, you should absolutely own
it, since you funded it.

i'm confused, though: the record company is the subject of the film.
are they helping you distribute it, as well?
Mfilmie28
Fan
hey doug...ok good, do you know of any good books that cover the
business side of documentary...all of mine just touch very briefly
and aren't much help. i want to have a document in front of me that
i can show him so i can explain this.
yes, they are helping distribute it--it will be sold in tower
records, indie record stores, on their website, at their shows, etc.
but i will be putting it in the festival circuit and we'll see if we
can get it to some art houses first...maybe we'll make a tv cut too.
Deleted User
Fan
Hello there people!

I have a big question. I am involved in a project that is most likely
going to be shooting overseas. Now, having looked at Michael
Moore's "Farenheight 9/11" and how politically charged it is, I am
wondering about his need for release forms concerning Senators,
Congressmen etc. I doubt he got permission from some of the people he
interviewed.

Now my problem is this, (If things go well) I will be interviewing
politicians from countries other than here in the States....what sort
of rules apply?
Robert Goodman
Pro
all sorts depending on where the doc will be shown. e.g., which
countries. You need a signed release as protection for your film.
The other rules apply to what you can and can't ask depending on who
you are talking to. Politicians have handlers. Expect them to set
rules.
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